Jan 30, 2023  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HIST 379 - American Nation (1909-1939)


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 212. An examination of social, cultural, economic and political changes in the United States from the Progressive Era, through the First World War, to the Great Depression and the New Deal.
  
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    HIST 380 - American Experience in World War II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 212. An analysis of the diverse nature of the American experience in World War II, a conflict often regarded by Americans as a “good war.” This course surveys a variety of topics, including diplomacy, military strategy, the nature of combat, the home front, and the war as a catalyst for change in society.
  
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    HIST 401 - History of Modern Germany


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 112 or 113. This course covers the history of the German states from the Eighteenth century to the present. Study of the rise of German nationalism, pattern of German unification, and dissolution and reunification of Germany in the Twentieth century provides the focus of this course. Cultural, religious, and gender issues will also be discussed.
  
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    HIST 402 - Ancient Greece and Rome


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 111. Greece and Rome from earliest times to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West.
  
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    HIST 403 - Medieval Europe


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 111 or 112. A study of the political, economic, ecclesiastical and cultural development of Europe during the Middle Ages from the fall of Rome to the Period of the Renaissance.
  
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    HIST 404 - The Age of Discovery


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 112, 113 or 211. This course is an examination of the history of European exploration and colonialism from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries.  It focuses on the interactions between Europeans and indigenous peoples in cultural, social and religious contexts.
  
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    HIST 410 - History of Russia I


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 112. A study of the early history of Russia from prehistory through the nineteenth century including political, cultural, and social developments.
  
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    HIST 411 - History of Russia II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 112 or 113. A study of Russian history during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Topics covered include Napoleon’s invasion, the late czarist period, the revolutions of 1917, and the Soviet period.  The course concludes with an examination with the contemporary situation in Russia.
  
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    HIST 412 - Modern East Asia


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 113. The development of Asia in the 19th and 20th centuries.
  
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    HIST 414 - Middle Eastern History


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 112 or 113. An analysis of the development of Islamic civilization and its turbulent encounters with the Western world from the medieval period to the present Arab-Israeli conflict and “War on Terrorism.”
  
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    HIST 416 - History of Modern France


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 113. The development of France from 1789 to the present.
  
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    HIST 417 - Women’s History


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 111, 112 or 113. In addition to discussing women leaders in the world and those who have pushed for liberation and equality, an emphasis will be placed on the social and psychological images of ordinary women.
  
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    HIST 418 - History of Scandinavia


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 112 or 113 An examination of economic, social, and political historical trends in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, and Finland from the Viking Age through the twentieth century.
  
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    HIST 419 - America and the Vietnam War


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 212. An examination of the diplomatic and military history of the Vietnam War. Significant focus will also be directed toward the conflict’s myriad effects on American society–including the nation’s collective memory of the struggle.
  
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    HIST 420 - History of American Diplomacy I


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 212. History 420 surveys the development of United States diplomatic history, utilizing secondary readings, primary sources, fiction, and film.  Events such as the American Revolution, the War of 1812, continental expansion, the Mexican War, the Civil War, overseas expansion, and World Wars I & II will be examined within the context of domestic and international politics, ideology, and culture. Additionally, this course is intended to sharpen students analytical and critical thinking skills as well as cultivate an appreciation for the contemporary relevance of the historical material. Cross-listed under Political Science. (History = Parent)
  
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    HIST 421 - U.S. Since 1945


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 212. The United States in the postwar world.
  
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    HIST 423 - American Military History


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 212. An introduction to the development of American military history from the colonial period to the present. The political, economic and social influence of the military is emphasized with significant attention devoted to examining the military as a reflection of the broader American experience.
  
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    HIST 425 - Europe Since 1914


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 113. A study of Europe after World War I to the present, emphasizing the political, economic, and cultural problems which resulted from the two world wars, the Cold War, and the political changes in the world in the 1980s.
  
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    HIST 426 - The History of Motion Pictures in America


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 211 or HIST 212. Since the development of motion picture technology in the late 19th century, movies have been a powerful force in American culture and society.  This course will study the development of motion pictures as an art form, business, and cultural concept in the 20th century.  In doing so, we will look at how movies both mirrored and molded American society.  This will be done by both examining the history of motion pictures, and watching and discussing key movies released throughout the 20th century. 
  
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    HIST 430 - History of American Diplomacy II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 212. History 430 surveys the development of American diplomacy since World War II, utilizing secondary readings, primary sources, fiction, and film.  Events such as the origins of the Cold War, the development of the national security state, the Korean War, the arms race, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War, detente, the end of the Cold War, and post-Cold War challenges will be examined within the context of domestic and international politics, ideology, and culture.  Additionally, this course is intended to sharpen students’ analytical and critical thinking skills as well as cultivate an appreciation for the contemporary relevance of the historical material presented. Cross-listed with Political Science (Parent= History).
  
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    HIST 435 - Plantations in the American South


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211. This course is a study of the development of plantations in the American South from colonial settlement to the post-Civil War period. It examines how plantations were the cornerstone of Southern social and economic structure, and how they changed over time and location. Note: ELR credit course
  
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    HIST 450 - Historiography


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Declared History major and HIST 111 or 112, HIST 113, 211 and 212. This course provides history majors with the theoretical and practical foundations for further in-depth historical study. To that end, it combines a survey of trends in Western historical thought with preparations for an extensive individual research project to be completed in HIST 455:  Senior Thesis.  This course is a graduation requirement for all history majors.


     
  
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    HIST 455 - Senior Thesis


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 450 and 91 hours of college credit or permission of the instructor. This course is a required capstone research experience for all history majors.  It is intended to reinforce research and writing skills, to promote critical thinking, and to engender creative analysis of historical issues.  In consultation with a full-time history instructor of their choosing and using a prospectus prepared in HIST 450:  Historiography, students will complete an extensive individual research project and present it to their peers.  Completion of the Area Concentration Achievement Test (ACAT) or similar standardized assessment test is also required.  This class will be graded pass-fail.
  
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    HIST 469 - Internship in Applied History


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 111 or 112, HIST 113, 211, and 212. Prerequisite: Senior standing with a minimum major GPA of 3.5 and an overall GPA of 2.75. An internship under supervised observation and participation in a museum or archival depository. Arrangements for assignments, work hours and working conditions must meet with mutual satisfaction of the student, department chairperson and the agency. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
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    HIST 470 - Internship in Applied History


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 111 or 112, HIST 113, 211, and 212. Prerequisite: Senior standing with a minimum major GPA of 3.5 and an overall GPA of 2.75. An internship under supervised observation and participation in a museum or archival depository. Arrangements for assignments, work hours and working conditions must meet with mutual satisfaction of the student, department chairperson and the agency. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.

Hospitality & Tourism

  
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    HOMT 320 - Introduction to Hospitality Industry


    (3 hours) This introductory course acquaints the student with the scope and complexity of the hospitality industry by exploring the national and global relationships of lodging, food and beverage operations. The course examines career opportunities, organizational structures, history and human resource management. Students will examine trends, integrated technology and its effects on customer and guest service requirements in the lodging and food service industry. 
  
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    HOMT 321 - Organizational Behavior for the Hospitality Industry


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HOMT 320. Students will be presented with the techniques and methodologies to plan, organize, and control human resources in the hospitality and tourism industry.  The student will be exposed to the practices of recruiting, organizing, and directing employee relations.   Organizational behavioral essentials for the individual and the organization along with key management tasks will provide opportunities for practical, applied learning.  The course includes details on organizational development strategies in an increasingly diverse workplace.
  
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    HOMT 322 - Advanced Marketing for the Hospitality Industry


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HOMT 321. The principles and practices of marketing in the hospitality and tourism industry are presented. As an applied approach to marketing the tourism product, the course also compares and contrasts the unique approach of tourism marketing to classical marketing principles.  Studies demonstrating how marketing activities direct the flow of goods and services from product to consumer in the hospitality and tourism industry are included. The course also covers consumer satisfaction, sequential development steps in marketing, the key role of marketing research, and the growth of information technology.  The course introduces strategic industry marketing methods for successful planning and development.
  
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    HOMT 323 - Fundamentals of Planning and Developing Tourism


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HOMT 322. The issues of formulating the organization’s and industries’ strategic planning are emphasized. The components of the strategic plan for the tourism and hospitality industry including the vision, mission, objectives, tactical and operational goals, are examined.  Planning issues and corresponding planning processes for tourism development are introduced through case studies and applied learning techniques.  Tourism project design, financing, and development are addressed on a local, regional, and national level.
  
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    HOMT 324 - Economics of Tourism


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HOMT 323. This course uses contemporary economic analysis to help students understand the fundamental financial basis of tourism industry.  The course will communicate how to understand tourism market behavior as measured through fundamental and applied business economic principles. Business models and strategies will provide a detailed picture of the impact on the overall industry. A clear explanation of revenue management is also included. With a focus on basic economic principles, the course shows how elementary supply and demand analysis can be used to understand the broad changes in tourism over many centuries and today.
  
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    HOMT 325 - Case Studies in Hospitality and Tourism


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HOMT 324. This course allows students an opportunity to apply skills, knowledge, and understanding into operational strategies and tactics through a series of case studies across multiple sectors in the hospitality and tourism industry.  By presenting a collection of current stories culminated into cases from the real world experiences of industry practitioners, students will discover first-hand application strategies.  Students will discover issues and opportunities of practicing middle level hospitality managers and will benefit from the experienced educators and ex-industry employers who created the cases.

Human Resources

  
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    HRMT 321 - Labor Relations


    (3 hours) A study of the development of organized labor groups in society.  A discussion of contracts, NLRB, Labor Unions and employee associations will be covered.  A review and assessment of labor negotiations, strikes, walk outs, boycotts, lockouts and how these terms related to management and employees will be presented in a practical application format to include case studies and practicum exercises.  This course provides examples from the standpoint of management and human resources.
  
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    HRMT 322 - Organizational Culture


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HRMT 321. An examination of the nature, definitions and practices associated with organizational culture.  This course will review the impact of cultural differences on organizations and how to manage this diversity from an HR perspective.  Students will be required to research their own organizational culture, define the trigger points within the organization that impact outcomes as it relates to cultural bias, diversity, race, gender, occupations and desired organizational influence over a positive workplace environment.
  
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    HRMT 323 - Employee Training and Development


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HRMT 322. Define and assess how to conduct a needs assessment within an organization in determining training and development needs.  Demonstrate ability to identify stakeholders, determine organizational needs and provide a plan of action.  This course will require the development and implementation strategies for a training program within their own businesses.  Concentrate on meeting the needs of the expected audience and considering, development, costs, implementation, budgets and collateral needed to implement the training program will be essential parts of the plan.
  
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    HRMT 324 - Compensation


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HRMT 323. Review and demonstrate the basic assumptions related to employee compensation to include a review of various compensation models for both exempt and non-exempt employees.  Develop a compensation strategy for their organization or company and develop policies that support the compensation process.
  
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    HRMT 325 - Employment Law


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HRMT 324. A review and assessment of the legal aspects of human resources to include employment law, unionization, unfair labor practices, policies and procedures, ADA, FMLA, testing, performance management, employment-at-will, benefits and compensation.
  
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    HRMT 326 - Staffing


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HRMT 325. This course examines all aspects of getting employees into organizations. Recruitment and selection are the foci. This course covers scientific and legal issues from a managerial perspective and examines the usefulness of various methods used in job analysis, testing and measurement, and internal and external market analysis to include compensation and benefits. Legislation regarding EEO and affirmative action programs will also be discussed.  

Kinesiology

  
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    KINE 101 - Introduction to Kinesiology


    (2 hours) Prerequisite: Kinesiology major/minor or Physical Education or consent of the instructor. An introductory course for students interested in exploring activity-based careers. Content will include a study of the history, philosophy, objectives, current issues and trends in physical education, exercise science, sport and related areas. This course may not be challenged.
  
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    KINE 120 - Walking and Jogging for Wellness


    (1 hours) Instruction focuses on walking/jogging mechanics, physiological effects of cardiovascular activity, important equipment, motivational techniques and emotional benefits of exercise.
  
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    KINE 121 - High Intensity Functional Training


    (1 hours) The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design and follow a basic high intensity functional training program.
  
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    KINE 211 - Health and Fitness Assessment


    (3 hours) A course designed to provide information on the various methods available to assess health and fitness. Components of health and fitness which will be assessed in the laboratory include: diet, muscular strength, power and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, body composition, flexibility, heart rate and blood pressure. Recommended to take before KINE 380. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 216 - Perceptual Motor Learning


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 101, Kinesiology major or minor, Athletic Training major, Physical Education major, or by permission of instructor. Through lecture, discussion, and laboratory, this course provides an introduction to theories of motor learning and skill acquisition. Physiological aspects of kinesis applicable to the older child and adult will be considered. The following factors affecting motor skill learning will be included: feedback, transfer, mental practice, distributed vs. massed, reaction time, speed of movement, speed vs. accuracy and balance. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 224 - Prevention and Care: Recognition of Athletic Injuries


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: BIOL 226 and 226L or BIOL 210 and BIOL 210L.  This course focuses on the knowledge and skills used in the prevention, recognition, evaluation, and care of athletic related injuries and conditions. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 240 - Sport Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 101, 211 & 216. This course will focus on understanding the application of the mental aspects of human performance. This course is applicable to students in physical education, kinesiology, psychology, athletic training students, and athletes interested in improving their performance. Cross-listed with PSYC 240. PSYC= Parent. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 305 - Tests and Measurements


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. Use, interpretation, evaluation, and administration of tests peculiar to health and physical education; application to elementary statistical procedures. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 308 - Applied Kinesiology


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: BIOL 210 or 226/226L, 227/227L, KINE 101, 211, KINE 216, and junior standing. A study of the fundamentals of human motion as they relate to physical education activities and skill performance. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 308L - Applied Kinesiology Lab


    (1 hours) Prerequisite: BIOL 210 or 226/226L, 227/227L, KINE 101, 211, KINE 216, and junior standing. This laboratory will involve the measurement of acute exercise induced physiological changes entailing force and power production, cardiac and hemodynamic alterations, blood lactate and glucose as well as thermoregulation. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 326 - Biomechanics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 215, MATH 105 or higher and BIOL 210 and BIOL 210L or BIOL 226 and BIOL 226L. The scientific study of movement including the quantitative and qualitative analysis of fundamental and basic movement patterns. This course includes the study of mechanical principles (Newton’s laws of motion, torque, angular kinetics, etc.) and their application to teaching, improving, and perfecting fundamental movements.
  
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    KINE 335 - Sports Nutrition


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 101, 211 and BIOL 345. This course is designed to provide an overview of nutrient use in exercise and nutrition strategies to improve exercise performance. The course includes thorough review of current peer reviewed literature in Sports Nutrition. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 345 - Corrective Rehabilitation and Exercise Techniques


    (3 hours) Prerequistes: junior standing, KINE 101, 211, 216, 224, and 308 or permission of the instructor. This course will identify the assessment and intervention principles for a corrective exercise approach based on the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Correct Exercise Specialist training. Participants will learn assessment tools to identify orthopedic imbalances. Once identified, participants will learn appropriate intervention strategies, guided by the NASM continuum principles, for the restoration of biomechanical and neuromuscular function. This course will assist in preparation of future health and fitness professionals with current evidence-based injury prevention education. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 361 - Exercise Prescription for Wellness and Fitness


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: BIOL 226, 226L, 227 and 227L, KINE 211 and KINE 305 and junior standing. A course designed to teach scientifically valid techniques for conducting safe effective exercise and conditioning programs for healthy individuals. Included in this course are techniques for assessing the health and fitness status of individuals, evaluating their exercise test results, and prescribing exercise and conditioning programs based on these results. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 361L - Exercise Prescription for Wellness and Fitness Lab


    (1 hours) Prerequisite: BIOL 226, 226L, 227 and 227L, KINE 211 and KINE 305 and junior standing. This laboratory will address how to properly conduct medical history screening including primary risk factor identification and stratification in regards to apparently healthy adults. Furthermore, the course will provide practical testing techniques for cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition and muscular strength, endurance and flexibility testing procedures as well as proper classification of testing results. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 370 - Dynamics of Strength Training


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: junior standing; KINE 101, 211, BIOL 226/226L, BIOL 227/227L or permission of the instructor. The course provides the student with a comprehensive knowledge base concerning an individualized approach to strength training, including: anatomy, physiology and response to regular strength training. The course will integrate guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine, The National Strength and Conditioning Association, and The Surgeon’s General Report to properly design strength training program for general and special populations. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 380 - Physiology of Exercise


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: BIOL 210 and 210L, BIOL 226 and 226L, or BIOL 227 and 227L. Corequisitite: KINE 380L. An applied physiology course designed to study bioenergetics, cardiovascular and pulmonary responses, and neuromuscular dynamics during exercise.  Emphasis is placed on both acute and chronic physiological responses to exercise.
      This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 380L - Physiology of Exercise Lab


    (1 hours) Prerequisite: BIOL 210 & BIOL 210L or BIOL 226 & BIOL 226L or BIOL 227 & BIOL 227L. Corequisite: KINE 380. Laboratory experiences in the measurement of acute exercise induced physiological responses to supplement KINE 380 lectures and readings.  This course cannot be challenged.  Laboratory fee required.
  
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    KINE 390 - Pathophysiology of Chronic Disease and Exercise Intervention


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 211, KINE 215, and KINE 380 and BIOL 226 and BIOL 226L; Co-requisite BIOL 227 and BIOL 227L. The course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the pathophysiology of the most prevalent chronic conditions. Further, the student will learn how regular physical activity effectively manages chronic disease including: coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, peripheral artery disease, obesity, diabetes, arthritis, hypertension, high cholesterol and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

         

  
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    KINE 402 - Research Methods in Physical Activity


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 380, PSYC 305 or equivalent statistics course. A course designed to guide students in the kinesiology, athletic training, and exercises science disciplines, including sub-disciplines of rehabilitation, occupational therapy and physical therapy, through the research process from identifying and proposing a hypothesis, collecting data, and analyzing data to the compilation of results for presentation.  Applied statistics methods for qualitative and quantitative research are covered.
  
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    KINE 462 - Special Problems in Varsity Athletics I


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: A minimum of 6 credits from KINE 300 level or higher courses, or evidence of in-service athletic coaching. An intensive study of critical contemporary issues confronting in-service athletic coaching personnel. Special problem areas will be selected as related to advanced coaching techniques and the application of athletic training to specific sports.
  
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    KINE 463 - Physical Activity Epidemiology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 215, KINE 211, KINE 380, KINE 380L or permission of the instructor.  A research based course covering the basics of epidemiological research including design methodology and statistical techniques with direct application to physical activity.  The effects of physical activity on chronic diseases and their associated health care costs will be researched.  Students will become aware of and proficient in addressing the preventive and rehabilitative effects of appropriate exercise regimens.    This course cannot be challenged.

     

  
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    KINE 464 - Senior Seminar (Strength and Conditioning Path)


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 308, 345, 361, 380, and senior standing. This course will utilize the results of contemporary peer reviewed articles to train athletes for the primary goal of improving athletic performance. sport-specific testing sessions, strength training program design, implementation, and supervision will be examined to ensure effective strength training and conditioning programs for various athletic populations. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the National Strength and Conditioning certified strength and conditioning examination. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 465 - Senior Seminar (Clinical Path)


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: KINE 308, 361, & 380, and senior standing. The course addresses contemporary issue and theories in exercise science and physiology such as the fat and carbohydrate metabolism, the detrimental effects of ultra endurance events, the physiological factors, which limit exercise performance and lactate threshold training. Classroom experience includes presentations and point-counterpoint debates. Each student is required to lead one lecture on an approved subject. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    KINE 469 - Internship in Kinesiology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Kinesiology, Physical Education or Athletic Training major, Kinesiology 211 or 224, and 9 additional hours in Kinesiology or Athletic Training of which 6 hours must be upper level courses completed in residence, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the major, junior status (61 hours or more), and permission of the department chair. Internships are designed to provide students with practical experiences in activity-based programs and to explore career opportunities in these fields. A 3-credit internship requires 112 hours; 2 and 1 credit require 75 and 38 hours, respectively. Only 3 hours may be applied to the major or minor. Arrangements for assignments, work hours, and working conditions must be approved by the supervising professor, department chairperson and the site agency. Application forms requesting permission to participate in an internship can be obtained from the department office. This course cannot be challenged nor will transfer coursework or life/work experience satisfy this course requirement. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
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    KINE 470 - Internship in Kinesiology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Kinesiology, Physical Education or Athletic Training major, Kinesiology 211 or 224, and 9 additional hours in Kinesiology or Athletic Training of which 6 hours must be upper level courses completed in residence, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the major, junior status (61 hours or more), and permission of the department chair. Internships are designed to provide students with practical experiences in activity-based programs and to explore career opportunities in these fields. A 3-credit internship requires 112 hours; 2 and 1 credit require 75 and 38 hours, respectively. Only 3 hours may be applied to the major or minor. Arrangements for assignments, work hours, and working conditions must be approved by the supervising professor, department chairperson and the site agency. Application forms requesting permission to participate in an internship can be obtained from the department office. This course cannot be challenged nor will transfer coursework or life/work experience satisfy this course requirement. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.

Library Science

  
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    LIBR 104 - Library Research Methods


    (1 hours) A course designed to introduce students to academic library resources and systems. Emphasis will be placed on the application of critical thinking skills to the selection, access, evaluation, and ethical use of information. Includes online catalogs and the Library of Congress Classification system, print, and electronic information resources, and bibliographic documentation. This course may not be challenged.
  
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    LIBR 204 - Advanced Library Research Methods


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. A course designed to prepare students to participate in scholarly research by developing the critical thinking skills needed to locate, evaluate, organize, and utilize diverse information resources in the creation of new information.  This course is recommended for upper level students and students planning to pursue graduate studies.

Marketing

  
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    MRKT 310 - Principles of Marketing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Junior standing or Admission to the School of Business or approval of instructor. Concepts involved in the planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods and services.
  
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    MRKT 320 - Consumer Behavior


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MRKT 310 (grade of “C” or better). An interdisciplinary approach to the analysis and application of psychological, social, and cultural influences on the behavior of consumers and organizational buyers. The interrelationships of marketing actions and buyer behavior are analyzed with the goal of making effective marketing decisions.
  
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    MRKT 330 - Personal Selling and Sales Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business, MRKT 310 and MGMT 310 (grades of “C” or better). The course will cover functional aspects of sales force management, personal selling methods, procedures for recruiting, selecting, and training new salespeople, compensation and expense control systems, problems of sales force motivation and supervision; methods of territorial and quota management, sales department budgets, distributor-dealer relations, and other selected topics.
  
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    MRKT 340 - Retailing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MRKT 310 (grade of “C” or better). Analysis of major store functions including buying, selling, advertising, inventory and accounting control.
  
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    MRKT 350 - International Marketing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MRKT 310 (grade of “C” or better). Introduces the student to the major marketing management concepts that provide the basis for understanding multinational and global marketing concepts and tools. Attention is given to determine market potential, product modification, communication across languages and cultures, and unique distribution channels.
  
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    MRKT 360 - Advertising


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MRKT 310 (grade of “C” or better). Mass media communications with consumers. Strategic planning, media selection, copy design, and effectiveness measurement.
  
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    MRKT 410 - Market Research


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business, MRKT 310 (grade of “C” or better) and ECON 224 or MATH 213. Application of research methods in collecting, recording, and analyzing information relevant to making marketing decisions. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    MRKT 420 - Nonprofit Marketing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MRKT 310. This course provides concepts and tools to help managers of private nonprofit organizations (educational, religious, healthcare, arts, community service, etc.) achieve organizational objectives by effectively marketing their organizations, programs and services. Emphases will include (but not limited to): market research, development of marketing strategies, funding, volunteer recruitment and management, staffing, selection of board members, and integrated marketing communications.
  
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    MRKT 450 - Marketing Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business, MRKT 310 and MGMT 310 (grades of “C” or better). Application of marketing principles in the investigation and solution of marketing problems. Analysis of case situations and advanced marketing issues. This course cannot be challenged.

Management

  
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    MGMT 310 - Principles of Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Junior standing or Admission to the School of Business or approval of instructor. Decision making about the planning, organizing, staffing, and control of organizations.
  
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    MGMT 320 - Organizational Behavior


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MGMT 310 (grade of “C” or better). Analysis of individual and group behavior in organizations. Motivation, leadership, group dynamics, and management of conflict and change. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    MGMT 330 - Introduction to Management Science


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MATH 111 and ECON 224 or equivalents. This course introduces students to the concepts and methods of management science, which applies mathematical modeling and analysis to management problems.  Students will develop the skills necessary to use standard business software programs to build and evaluate models.  Topics covered include linear programming, modeling, sensitivity analysis, network optimization, binary integer programming, nonlinear programming, decision analysis, forecasting, queuing models, and computer simulation.
  
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    MGMT 331 - Operations Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business, MGMT 310 (grade of “C” or better) and ECON 224. Analytical decision making techniques used in the planning, design, and control of manufacturing and other operating systems. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    MGMT 340 - Human Resource Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MGMT 310 (grade of “C” or better). Hiring, training, evaluating, compensating, and maintaining a firm’s human resources.
  
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    MGMT 350 - Labor Relations


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MGMT 310 (grade of “C” or better). History, structure, and governance of labor unions, labor law, collective bargaining, and contract administration.
  
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    MGMT 370 - Non-Profit Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or permission of the instructor. Nonprofit Management focuses attention on the challenges of establishing, underwriting, growing and assessing associations, charities, cooperatives, and other voluntary organizations formed to further cultural, educational, religious, professional, or public service objectives. The course helps students more clearly understand the nature of nonprofit organizations and how those organizations seek to plan, organize, fund, manage people, and respond to both internal and external issues and events. Ultimately the course also seeks to encourage students to consider NPOs as a valid career opportunity.
  
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    MGMT 395 - Leadership


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MGMT 310 with a grade of “C” or better. This course is designed to help students develop leadership skills through understanding personal leadership styles, leadership theory, and a practical project that causes the student to engage in the practice of leadership.  The course will provide students with a general overview of the concept of leadership and equip them with practical tools necessary to lead others.
  
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    MGMT 411 - Organizational Change and Development


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business and MGMT 310 (grade of “C” or better). This senior-level management course focuses attention on the structures, processes and outcomes of organizations and the ways those organizations can be developed and transformed through change. Special emphasis will be placed on examining a variety of conceptual models that can offer insight into both the character of organizations (and the changes they undergo) and how these characteristics offer insight into purposeful change intervention.
  
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    MGMT 420 - Small Business Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business, MRKT 310 and MGMT 310 (grades of “C” or better). This course is designed to acquaint the student with the process of developing and implementing a small business. Concepts that will be covered in the course include market strategy, financial planning, site selection, human resources, merchandising, customer services, and credit/collection. The student will be expected to assume the role of entrepreneur and develop a small business organization in this class.
  
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    MGMT 440 - Procurement and Materials Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Business, MRKT 310 and MGMT 310 (grades of “C” or better), and ECON 224. Concepts related to the purchasing, maintenance, and movement of a firm’s supplies. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    MGMT 441 - Employee Staffing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 224 and MGMT 340. This course describes the human resource management activity of staffing, which encompasses how organizations recruit, select, and retain human talent.  Students will learn about concepts and practices pertaining to ways organizations seek and attract people (both within and outside the organization) to apply for employment, screen and systematically select the best candidates from a pool of qualified recruits, and deal with employee retention and turnover.  Students also learn about technological and environmental influences on recruitment and selection practices, including some legislative and regulatory specifics related to equal employment opportunity, particularly in selection.  This course will be cross-listed as BUSI 541
  
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    MGMT 442 - Employee Training and Development


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MGMT 340. This course describes the human resource management activity of employee training and development, also known as human resource development (HRD).  Students will learn concepts and practices pertaining to ways organizations use formal training, developmental job assignment, and mentoring, among other methods, to develop employees.  Students will apply adult learning theory and instructional systems design concepts to specify the training needs analysis, design, delivery (including technological elements), and multilevel evaluation of a training topic.   The course will be cross-listed as BUSI 542.
  
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    MGMT 443 - Employee Compensation and Benefits


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 224 and MGMT 340. This course describes the human resource management activity of compensation and benefits administration.  Students will learn about concepts, structures, and practices pertaining to ways organizations reward employees for satisfactory service, incentivize extraordinary service from employees, and promote employees’ welfare and retention by providing various benefits.  Students also learn about strategic and contextual influences on organizations’ compensation practices, including some legislative and regulatory specifics related to certain employee benefits and employee cash wages.  This course will be cross-listed with BUSI 543.   
  
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    MGMT 444 - Human Resource Law


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: BUSI 336 and MGMT 340. This course is designed to introduce students to the legal issues that directly affect individual employees and institutions in which they work.  Students will review the coverage and application of major federal workplace legislation including OSHA, FLSA, FMLA, and NLRA along with complementary state and local employment laws.  Anti-discrimination law as administered by the EEOC will also receive extensive treatment.  The course will be taught with a heavy emphasis on case study to ensure an understanding of the practical application of employment law in the “real world.”  The course will be cross-listed with BUSI 544.         

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 098 - Elementary Algebra Review


    (1 hours) Prerequisite: SAT Math below 440 or student requests/advisor suggests course for review purposes. A review of the concepts of Elementary Algebra to help prepare the student for MATH 111. This course is graded Pass or Fail. The hour earned does not count toward graduation.
  
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    MATH 099 - Beginning Algebra


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to CSU through the Bridge Program or appropriate score on the MATH Placement Exam. A course in basic algebra skills for students who are deemed at risk in the area of Mathematics. Topics include properties of the real numbers; fundamental operations with linear expressions, solutions of linear equations and inequalities; operations on polynomial expressions, including polynomial division; graphing linear equations on the Cartesian Coordinate system; functions; factoring of quadratic and other polynomial expressions; solving quadratic equations; operations on rational and radical expressions; solving rational and radical equations. Course is required of students accepted Into the Bridge program. Class meets 4 lecture hours and a (minimum of one) 30-minute individual tutoring appointment every week. Students must pass the course with a ‘C’ or better before matriculating from the Bridge Program and/or to any other Mathematics course. This course may not be attempted more than twice. Students receive institutional credit only. Note: 099 courses will be calculated in student GPAs but will not be included in the earned hours toward graduation (CSU students typically need 125 hours for graduation).
  
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    MATH 100 - Mathematics


    (3 hours) Designation reserved for elective credit received under the CLEP program.
  
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    MATH 105 - Introduction to Mathematical Structures


    (3 hours) A terminal course for students in selected majors which do not require further study in mathematics.  Topics include basic concepts of algebra, set theory, logic, probability, statistical investigation of data, and an introduction to applied mathematical models including certain aspects of consumer mathematics.  This course may not be taken for credit by students who already have credit in a mathematics course numbered 130 or higher.
  
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    MATH 110 - Extended College Algebra


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: ACT score 19-20; SAT score 440-480; grade of C or better in MATH 099. An extended version of College Algebra designed for Science, Business and Education majors to prepare them for further study in mathematics. Topics include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs, equations and inequalities, systems of equations. Emphasis is placed on solving problems involving natural science and engineering applications. A graphing calculator is required.
  
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    MATH 111 - College Algebra


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 099 or departmental permission. A course designed for Science, Business and Education majors to prepare them for further study in mathematics. Topics include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs, equations and inequalities, systems of equations. Emphasis on solving problems involving natural science and engineering applications. A graphing calculator is required.
  
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    MATH 130 - Precalculus


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 110 or 111 (grade of “C” or better) or departmental permission. This course provides the student with a thorough preparation for the Calculus sequence. Topics include study of exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, inverse functions, trigonometry and trigonometric identities, conic sections, and polar coordinates. Additional topics, including the binomial theorem, mathematical induction, and sequences and series may be covered as time permits.
  
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    MATH 201 - Math for Early Childhood and Elementary Education Majors I


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Education 201; MATH 110 or 111 (grade of “C” or better) or satisfactory score on departmental placement examination. This course is required of prospective elementary and early childhood school teachers.  Topics include the meaning of numbers, fundamental operations of arithmetic, the structure of the real number system and its subsystems, and elementary number theory.  The most current research-based methods of computation will be taught as well as pedagogical  content knowledge of number and operations.  This course does not count toward a major or minor in Mathematics or Natural Science.  This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    MATH 202 - Math for Early Childhood and Elementary Education Majors II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 201 (grade of “C” or better). This course is required of prospective elementary and early childhood school teachers.  The NCTM Standards in geometry, algebra, measurement, and data analysis and probability will be integrated throughout the activities in this course as well as pedagogical content knowledge in those mathematical  strands. This course does not count for a major or minor in Mathematics or Natural Science. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    MATH 206 - Number Concepts for Middle School Teachers


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 110/111 and EDUC 201 (Grade of “C” or better) or satisfactory score on departmental placement examination. This course provides a foundation in number concepts appropriate for middle school teachers. Topics include numeration systems, number theory, rational numbers, ratio and proportions, and integers as they are used in middle school. Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding, problem solving, mental arithmetic, and computational estimation.
  
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    MATH 207 - Geometry for Middle and High School Teachers


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 130 (grade of “C” or better). This course is a study of the basic principles of geometry and its relation to algebra and other strands of mathematics.  It is designed to provide prospective teachers with the background knowledge of geometry required to effectively teach the subject.  A  conceptual understanding of geometry and the mathematical process of reasoning and proof will be emphasized as well as practice given in teaching the subject.
 

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