May 22, 2024  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

General Education

  
  • GNED 101 - Freshman Seminar


    (1 hours) Requirement: new student status. An introduction to the meaning and significance of higher education, to the challenges inherent in university life, and to the values characterized by Christian higher education and by Charleston Southern University in particular. Topics include making the transition to campus life, academic/classroom skills, goal setting, and lifestyle decisions.
  
  • GNED 102 - Honors Seminar


    (1 hours) Requirement: Students participating in the Honors Program only. This course provides an introduction to many of the extracurricular offerings of the Charleston area, including (but not limited to) cultural and spiritual enhancement. Class may include required attendance at off-campus events. In-class expectations include group discussion, personal journals, and possible guest lectures on areas of general interest. This course is required of all honors students, and must be taken the first fall semester that an honors student attends Charleston Southern University.
  
  • GNED 103 - Strategies for Academic Success


    (2 hours) The purpose of this course is to promote college success to those who have had difficulty meeting the academic specifications CSU requires by providing advanced learning strategies as well as familiarizing them with roles and functions of the University along with making effective academic and career decisions.
  
  • GNED 107 - College Reading and Study Skills for the Christian College


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Freshman Bridge students only. A course designed to develop the complex reading and study skills essential for successful participation in university curriculum. Focuses on content area reading and study strategies, reading and critical thinking skills. A focus on the nature of learning and the individual’s responsibility to learn. An introduction to the Christian worldview and its application in Christian higher education, with emphasis on critical thinking skills necessary for college-level academic work and for other issues commonly facing college students. General elective credit. Note: Required for all Bridge students.
  
  • GNED 111 - Introduction to Christian Worldview and Critical Thinking


    (1 hours) Prerequisite: new student status. An introduction to the Christian worldview and its application in Christian higher education, with emphasis on critical thinking skills necessary for college-level academic work and for other issues commonly facing college students. Other topics include calling (both short-term and long-term), study skills, time management, and campus resources and policies.
  
  • GNED 201 - Career Planning Seminar


    (1 hours) Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior students are encouraged to enroll. This course is designed to help students create a professional profile, develop effective career planning skills, develop self-marketing skills through Mock Interviews, create a winning portfolio, learn business etiquette, learn networking skills, salary negotiation and learn effective job search skills. Final grade is calculated into student GPA.  The course is offered each fall and spring semesters.
  
  • GNED 202 - Honors Seminar: Ethics & Leadership


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors Program and Sophomore standing. This course encourages students to consider issues in ethics and leadership from a variety of viewpoints, including readings in Christian values and moral philosophy, and discussion of ethical and leadership issues in research, professional, and practical situations.
  
  • GNED 205 - Peer Education: An Introduction to the Practice of Students Helping Students


    (2 hours) Prerequisites: minimum 2nd semester Freshman, 2.8 GPA, faculty/staff recommendation. This course introduces students to a broad range of effective approaches to peer education. We will explore the history and efficacy of peer education.  We will explore critical thinking, diverse learning modalities, and the impact of social-cultural differences on learning. Through discussion of theory and practice of various peer education strategies, you will learn to assess and revise your own learning practices and make use of this knowledge to communicate with students.  The course will also include experiential components such as team-building and presentation skills.  Students will also participate in an experiential assignment with two different campus departments to explore how what they are learning in the classroom might be beneficial to use as a peer educator at Charleston Southern University.   
  
  • GNED 400 - Honors Senior Project


    (1 - 4 hours) The Honors Senior Project is a substantial independent project in the student’s major area of study. The nature of Honors Senior Project will vary significantly from program to program. Some projects will require field study akin to an internship, while others will more closely resemble traditional readings and academic writing, while others may involve conducting and reporting a sustained laboratory experiment. All Honors Senior projects should involve a substantial amount of research and provide a capstone experience for student’s Honor Program curriculum.
  
  • GNED 405 - Interdisciplinary Studies: Humanities and Fine Arts


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: Senior Status and Interdisciplinary majors only. A course calling for integrative reflection on and prospective application of the student’s undergraduate education: cross disciplinary exploration of learning objectives and research.  The goal is to exit college with a sense of vocation drawing on a broad field of learning and of the possibilities for meaningful work.
  
  • GNED 406 - Interdisciplinary Studies: Social and Human Sciences


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: Senior Status and Interdisciplinary majors only. A course calling for integrative reflection on and prospective application of the student’s undergraduate education: cross disciplinary exploration of learning objectives and research.  The goal is to exit college with a sense of vocation drawing on a broad field of learning and of the possibilities for meaningful work.
  
  • GNED 469 - Applied Learning Experience (APPLE)


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Junior/Senior standing (61 semester hours or more), transfer students must have at least 15 semester hours taken in residence at CSU, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or permission of the department chair or dean, successful completion of the APPLE orientation, and an approved APPLE contract. The Applied Learning Experience (APPLE) is a carefully monitored internship course and work experience in which the student has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on those goals throughout the experience. The APPLE experience requires 120 hours of supervised work in an approved professional work setting off campus. The course is designed to allow the student to focus on important career topics such as organization, professional culture, decision-making, leadership, and values and ethics in the workplace. General elective credit will be given for satisfactory completion of the course. A maximum of 6 credit hours may be awarded for any combination of APPLE and academic Internships.    This course cannot be challenged. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis.
  
  • GNED 470 - Applied Learning Experience (APPLE)


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Junior/Senior standing (61 semester hours or more), transfer students must have at least 15 semester hours taken in residence at CSU, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 or permission of the department chair or dean, successful completion of the APPLE orientation, and an approved APPLE contract. The Applied Learning Experience (APPLE) is a carefully monitored internship course and work experience in which the student has intentional learning goals and reflects actively on those goals throughout the experience. The APPLE experience requires 120 hours of supervised work in an approved professional work setting off campus. The course is designed to allow the student to focus on important career topics such as organization, professional culture, decision-making, leadership, and values and ethics in the workplace. General elective credit will be given for satisfactory completion of the course.  A maximum of 6 credit hours may be awarded for any combination of APPLE and academic Internships.   This course cannot be challenged. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis.

Geography

  
  • GEOG 200 - Introduction to Geography


    (3 hours) A survey of how the earth’s environment, especially its distribution of climates and resources, exerts a limiting and conditioning impact upon human culture. Also examined closely are the various ways in which political and economic policies affect resource depletion, pollution, and energy sources on a global scale.

Geology

  
  • GEOL 100 - Earth Science for Educators


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: Permission of the Education department. This course is designed for early childhood and elementary education majors following the state of South Carolina’s science standards for grades kindergarten through 8th grade. Earth Science is designed to introduce the student to how planet Earth works in our Sun’s and its own integrated system. Students will investigate the materials and major processes that shape the earth and the geologic hazards that affect our lives. Mineral, water and energy resources will be considered in the context of their occurrence, interactions and limitations. A view of Earth’s role in space and the formation of planets and stars will be studied. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. (Lab fee required.) Credit may not be received for both this course and Physical Geology 101.
  
  • GEOL 101 - Physical Geology


    (4 hours) The natural processes that operate on and within the Earth will be explored utilizing the methods of scientific inquiry-facts, hypothesis and experiments. The plate tectonic framework will be used to illustrate the causes and effects of earthquakes, volcanoes and mountain building. Surface processes such as streams, glaciers and shorelines will also be examined. Laboratory exercises will accompany and augment these topics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) Credit may not be received for both this course and Earth Science 100. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • GEOL 102 - Historical Geology


    (4 hours) As a result of the processes that occur on and within the Earth, a wonderful history of the Earth is preserved. Methods of analysis and interpretation will be utilized to examine the geology, flora and fauna of each geologic era. Laboratory exercises will accompany and augment these topics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • GEOL 103 - Ocean Science


    (4 hours) A largely nonmathematical undergraduate course in the study of the earth’s oceans, this course examines the structure, composition, and properties of the oceans: origin and history of the oceans, chemistry and physics of ocean water, effects of the oceans on global climate, ocean circulation, effect of the earth’s rotation on the behavior of the oceans, solar and lunar tides. Tsunamis, interaction of oceans with shorelines, life forms of the oceans, and sea level variations are other topics examined. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • GEOL 104 - Environmental Geology


    (4 hours) A course designed to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of how the environment of water, air, and climate are influenced and affected by geological change. Emphasis is on understanding the mechanics of geological processes and the interrelationship with environmental issues. Field trip experiences include waste treatment systems, hydropower and nuclear energy sites, and hazardous waste sites. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.

Healthcare

  
  • HCMT 320 - Introduction to Healthcare in the US


    (3 hours) This course serves as the introduction to the health care system in the United States.  This course will include the historical development and growth of the system.  The course examines the structure and condition of the system, to include:  how health care is provided, how health care is utilized, public and private organization, the impact of government influence on the system, and cost and basic funding within health care.  The student will be able to identify and understand the role of key agencies, such as the Joint Commission, AMA and other accreditation entities that impact health care outcomes.
  
  • HCMT 321 - Healthcare Economics


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HCMT 320. This course evaluates the economics of the health care system, with analysis of the health care industry’s financial flow and how that financial flow differentiates from that of any other industry. Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of the basic terminology and economic principles exhibited in the functioning of the US health care system.  Financial planning and budget constraints specific to the industry will be assessed.  Current US health care industry trends will also be analyzed and evaluated as predictors for the future of the industry.
  
  • HCMT 322 - Healthcare Human Resources


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HCMT 321. This course focuses on human resource management skills used by business managers in day-to-day operations. While focusing on the different aspects of human resource management and practices, problem solving and critical thinking skills are applied. Note: Cannot earn credit for HCMT 322 and ECBA 402.
  
  • HCMT 323 - Healthcare Information & Management Systems


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HCMT 322. This course provides an overview of basic methodologies for the gathering and tracking of health care information & data.  Students will be able to identify the basic tools and technologies for the management of information within the industry.  General medical terminology, medical information management systems, and data tracking will be evaluated.  Students will be required to identify guidelines for maintaining information within the health care industry to include the legal requirements associated with patient data. 
  
  • HCMT 324 - Healthcare Policy & Law


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HCMT 323. This course explores in a general overview how the legal process and US political system impacts the health care system.  An introduction to basic health care law will be provided.  Students will examine topics such as privacy, patient’s rights, liability of individual practitioners and health care organizations.  Students will be able to identify how specific legislation, such as the Affordable Care Act of 2010, Sarbanes-Oxley and other laws which impact the system.  A discussion of how legislation impacts Medicare, Medicaid reimbursements, and how private insurance impacts policy development and implementation.  The impact of current legal issues and the American political environment on individuals and providers within the health care system will be evaluated.  Students will be required to provide an analysis of potential health care reform for the future.
  
  • HCMT 325 - Healthcare Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HCMT 324. This course serves as the introduction to health care management. Foundational management skills will be provided, such as:  productivity management, work flow, resource planning, operations, and leadership. Students will gain an awareness of the potential benefits of building positive relationships with various health care providers and how partnerships can be formed to enhance patient outcomes.    This course will equip students with the applied skills for transitioning from health care practitioner to health care manager.  Students will also be required to evaluate operational financial management and change management aspects within the health care system.  This will include the flow of information needed to enhance diverse and complex patient needs and outcomes.  As with all aspects of management this course will provide an overview of ethical practices related to health care management.  Ethical issues may include; How are decisions made related to patient care?  What impact does the “Patient Bill of Rights” have on ethics and patient outcomes?

Health, Physical Education and Sports

  
  • HPES 101 - Aerobics and Physical Fitness


    (1 hours) Instruction in acquired and maintaining optimum fitness on individual basis. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 104 - Beginning Badminton


    (1 hours) Instruction in basic skills, techniques, knowledge, rules and strategies necessary to begin the successful enjoyment of badminton. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 106 - Beginning Bowling


    (1 hours) Instruction in basic skills, techniques, knowledge, rules and appreciations necessary for successful enjoyment in bowling. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 108 - Beginning Golf


    (1 hours) The development of basic skills, techniques, knowledge, rules and appreciations necessary for successful participation in recreational golf. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 109 - Beginning Gymnastics and Tumbling


    (1 hours) The development of knowledge and skills necessary for teaching and demonstrating basic gymnastics and tumbling skills. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. This course cannot be challenged. (Lab fee required).
  
  • HPES 113 - Beginning Soccer


    (1 hours) The development of basic skills, knowledge, rules, and appreciations necessary for successful participation in a game of soccer. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 114 - Beginning Swimming


    (1 hours) The development of basic skills, knowledge, rules, and appreciations necessary for the successful participation in recreational swimming. Taught to American Red Cross Standards. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required)
  
  • HPES 118 - Beginning Tennis


    (1 hours) The development of basic skills, knowledge, rules and appreciations necessary for successful participation and enjoyment in recreational tennis. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 121 - Beginning Weight Lifting


    (1 hours) Instruction in basic skills, knowledge, and rules necessary for participation in weight lifting. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 132 - Intermediate Tennis


    (1 hours) Instruction in basic skills, knowledge, and rules necessary for participation in tennis for students possessing tennis abilities beyond the beginning level. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 134 - Lifeguarding


    (2 hours) Prerequisites: 500 yard swim, demonstrate ability to tread water, 20 yard underwater swim. The development of skills, knowledge, and appreciation necessary for completion of American Red Cross Lifeguarding Certificate. (Fee required)
  
  • HPES 202 - School Health


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Must be majoring in Physical Education or Elementary Education. A study of health in school, including objectives, problems relating to health environment, health service, and health instruction. A course designed primarily for individuals going into teaching.
  
  • HPES 317 - Physical Education and Health Curriculum and Methods for Early Childhood and Elementary Grades


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program. Should be taken the prior to clinical practice. Study of early childhood and elementary grades physical education and health curricula and methods.  Emphasis on instructional strategies in physical education and health. Examination of the South Carolina curriculum standards for physical education and health and research findings regarding effective teaching strategies in physical education and health. National and state standards are emphasized. Using the Expanded ADEPT Evaluation System candidates will construct a long-range plan and unit work sample.  A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 331 - Individual and Dual Sports


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Physical Education major or permission of instructor. The introduction, theory and participation in individual and dual sports activities. Basic rules, terms, development appropriateness, skills analysis, and teaching strategies are covered. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 347 - Methods of Instruction: Football and Soccer


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Physical Education major or by permission of instructor. Methods of instruction for teaching football and soccer in physical education programs. Basic rules, terms, determination of developmental appropriate skills, skills analysis, teaching strategies and assessment are covered. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 348 - Methods of Instruction: Volleyball and Basketball


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Physical Education major or by permission of instructor. Methods of instruction for teaching volleyball and basketball in physical education programs. Basic rules, terms, determination of developmentally appropriate skills, skills analysis, teaching strategies and assessment are covered. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 349 - Methods of Instruction: Baseball/Softball and Track and Field


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Physical Education major or by permission of instructor. Methods of instruction for teaching baseball/softball and track and field in physical education programs. Basic rules, terms, determination of developmental appropriate skills, skills analysis, teaching strategies and assessment are covered.
  
  • HPES 350 - Methods of Instruction: Educational Gymnastics and Dance


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Physical Education major or by permission of instructor. Theory and pedagogical content related to teaching children rhythmic activities, stunts and tumbling, dance and other movement skills, which meet the goals and objectives of the South Carolina Frameworks for Physical Education. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 404 - Strategies for Managing Individual Differences in Physical Education


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 201 and KINE 215. A course designed to study the characteristics and motor abilities of disabled students including: multicultural characteristics, psychosocial and physical development, mental disabilities, specific learning disabilities, emotional and behavioral disorders, orthopedically disabling conditions, hearing and visual impairments, diabetes, etc. The specific responsibilities mandated to Physical Education by Public Law 94-142 are discussed as well as methods and types of screening and assessment, writing individualized education programs (IEPs), facilitating learning by determining unique needs and eliminating disruptive behaviors. (12 hours practicum required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HPES 405 - Organization and Administration of Physical Education: Advocacy


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: KINE 215 or permission of the instructor. A study of the procedures of organizing and administering the physical education program. Consideration given to class organization, staff relations, budget and financing, facilities and equipment.
  
  • HPES 427 - Physical Education and Health Curriculum and Methods for Secondary Grades


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Study of grades 6-12 physical education and health curricula and methods.  Emphasis on instructional strategies in physical education and health. Examination of the South Carolina curriculum standards for physical education and health and research findings regarding effective teaching strategies in physical education and health. National and state standards are emphasized. Using the Expanded ADEPT Evaluation System candidates will construct a long-range plan and unit work sample.  A 40-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged.

Health Promotion

  
  • HEAL 100 - Essentials of Health Education and Promotion


    (3 hours) Recommended for health promotion majors and minors only, or permission of instructor. Essentials of Health Promotion introduces the student to the core competencies exhibited by health education and promotion professionals. Emphasizing the development of personal value in leading and serving as health education specialists, the course will prepare students with an introduction to the historical, theoretical and philosophical foundations of the profession and practice of health education and promotion, and a strong foundation of knowledge on the core skills and desired traits of a health education specialists, professional standards, available health education and promotion certifications, graduate education opportunities and employment tracks.
  
  • HEAL 201 - Dimensions of Personal Health and Wellness


    (3 hours) A course designed to review the principles and practices of personal health in relation to physical, social, environmental, intellectual and spiritual dimensions of wellness.
  
  • HEAL 209 - Concepts of Community and Public Health


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Completion of HEAL 100 or permission of instructor. This course introduces the student to introductory concepts of community and public health. Beginning level knowledge and skills that foster health promotion and disease prevention strategies among individuals, groups and communities are developed. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HEAL 212 - Life Span Diseases and Disorders


    (3 hours) This course introduces the student to basic pathophysiological concepts of communicable and chronic diseases throughout various stages of life span, with emphasis on prevention, cure, cause, and progression of disease. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HEAL 240 - Human Nutrition & Health Education


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HEAL 201. This course introduces the biology and chemistry of nutrients; how they are metabolized and the role they play in the human body. Topics to be discussed include dietary guidelines and trends, food safety, and labeling.  A broad overview of carbohydrates, lipids, protein, vitamins, and mineral will be presented. Also included will be sections on weight control, diet and health, and food safety.
  
  • HEAL 300 - Informatics for the Healthcare Professional


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CSCI 209 This course will focus on informatics relevant to healthcare, basics of computer concepts, networking, security and privacy, and information competency. Computer uses in healthcare, software skills necessary for professional career development as well as clinical informatics will be included in a contemporary, mainstream perspective. Cross-listed with HEAL. (Nursing=Parent)
  
  • HEAL 301 - Foundations of Health Education


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Completion of HEAL 309 (grade of “C” or better). The course provides the student with an introduction to the profession and practice of health education and promotion. The historical, theoretical and philosophical foundations of health and health promotion will be explored. An overview of social, cultural, and physical environmental factors which influence perceptions of health will be presented. Students will be exposed to responsibilities and opportunities within the field of health promotion.
  
  • HEAL 304 - Community Immersion


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Student must be a Health Promotion major, a minimum of a 2.75 overall GPA and a 2.75 GPA in Health Promotion major classes, and receive permission from the Director of Health Promotion. This course allows the student the opportunity to apply principles of health education and promotion in completing a comprehensive experiential learning opportunity.  Working with faculty and a preceptor, the student will gain knowledge and skills in a selected healthcare or community setting.  A minimum of 90 community experience hours are required to complete the course. Note: Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • HEAL 305 - Social Marketing for Public Health


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 105 or higher and ENGL 112. This course examines marketing principles as they relate to the health sciences. In order for health science education and policy to be effective, the health science professional must be adept at employing social marketing strategies. The creation of effective strategies has the potential to have a lasting impact and change behaviors at the community and individual levels.
  
  • HEAL 306 - Health Economics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 105 or higher and ENGL 111. An introduction to the applications of economics to health care in the United States and its effect on society and the field of health sciences. This course will analyze the health care system: healthcare institutions, demand for health, insurance, the role of the government, and the role of the health care sector in the overall economy. Pertinent topics such as universal health care will also be discussed and analyzed.
  
  • HEAL 307 - Epidemiologic Methods and Environmental Health


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 209 or permission of the instructor. The course offers a broad overview of environmental factors and their effects on the health of individuals, groups and communities with an emphasis on the application of basic methods of epidemiology and practical skill development in the epidemiologic investigation of diseases.  This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HEAL 309 - Theories of Health Behaviors


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HEAL 100 and HEAL 209 or permission of the instructor. The course provides the student with the basis for guiding health behavior change in individuals, families, and communities through an emphasis on theoretical framework and it application in health education and promotion. Health behavior theories and models will be discussed and applied to explore factors that determine and influence health behavior in humans and will form a behavioral foundation for effective health promotion and health education program planning. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HEAL 310 - Public Health Advocacy


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 100 and 209. This course establishes a framework within which advocacy is understood to be an essential role of the public health professional in promoting, implementing and sustaining effective public health policy. Through case studies, readings, lectures, role plays, field research and action planning, students will develop the skills needed to be an effective advocate for public health.
  
  • HEAL 313 - Alternative and Complementary Therapies in Healthcare


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. The course introduces students to selected alternative and complementary therapies used and discussed in healthcare literature. The student will investigate and evaluate the literature about alternative and complementary therapies for potential benefit in maintaining and improving health. Current best evidence about the efficacy and safety of alternative and complementary therapies will be explored. Cross listed with NURS (NURS = parent).
  
  • HEAL 314 - Public Health Field Research Practicum


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 100; Student must have a 2.75 or higher GPA; Permission from the instructor is required to join this seminar. This course allows the student the opportunity to apply principles of public health research while working with a team to complete a designated project. Working with faculty and research team members, the student will gain knowledge and skills about conducting mixed-methods research in the Health Sciences.  The research process and application of research findings to community health will be addressed.  Emphasis is on the basic elements of conducting research to address community health issues, with consideration of the application of research findings in health promotion program planning and evaluation, as well as in disseminating recommendations for such application through accepted & respected channels within the field.  A major focus will be on sharing research results in presentation and peer-reviewed publication form, and students will gain detailed experience in results communication and interpretation, becoming skilled in the generation, review, and critique of published research. Note: Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • HEAL 315 - Public Health Research Methods


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 100 and 209. The research process and application of research findings in the fields of community health and public health promotion will be addressed.  Emphasis is on the basic elements of conducting research to address community health issues, including the review and critique of published research with consideration of the application of research findings in health promotion program planning and evaluation as well as disease prevention. Detailed study of research methods will include quantitative and qualitative tools, analyzing the benefits and limitations of different designs.  Issues of researcher positionality, notions of objectivism, questions of epistemology, and the trend in the field towards mixed-methods approaches will be discussed and debated.
  
  • HEAL 320 - Assessment and Planning Methods in Health Education and Promotion


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 209, HEAL 309, or permission of the instructor. The course prepares the student with skills to effectively assess and plan health education and promotion strategies to address community health needs. The course will focus on the assessment process, including the role of data collection and analysis in gaining an understanding on the factors that influence community health needs and behaviors and program planning methods, including the utilization and application of evidence-based practice, planning models and theories in health promotion programming, developing goals and objectives, community organizing and engagement, and intervention strategy selection.
  
  • HEAL 398 - Translational Research Writing in the Social Sciences


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, ENGL 112, HEAL 100, HEAL 315 and permission of the instructor. This small seminar course is designed to teach upper-level students how to develop and write scholarly papers and professional articles in the social sciences, with special emphasis on health sciences and interdisciplinary work.  The course is intended for students interested in graduate study or professional research writing to translate program evaluations in the field.  Students will learn how to effectively and efficiently translate research from literature reviews, primary data collection, secondary data analysis, conveying implications for the field. Students also will learn to convey data in methods and results sections. Students will gain skills organizing materials to produce scholarly works including theses and papers for peer-reviewed publication in the social sciences.  Students will be introduced to basic grant writing skills.
  
  • HEAL 399 - Health and Wellness Coaching


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 100 and 201. An examination and business analysis of professional health coaching. The course covers wellness from a Christian worldview with special attention given to helping clients develop a faith-based fitness foundation. Professional coaches work to develop clients holistically, and this course will cover how to ethically and professionally inspire people to develop healthy lifestyles and new skills to maintain a well-balanced life. Running a business as a coach requires skills in development, administration, marketing, and entrepreneurship. This course will provide a foundation for health professionals interested in coaching in corporate and/or entrepreneurial settings.
  
  • HEAL 400 - Internship Preparation


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: Heal 309 or permission of instructor. This course fosters professional preparation and development for the student’s internship experience with emphasis on self-assessment, developing personal learning goals and objectives, resume, cover letter and reference construction, and interview methods.
  
  • HEAL 401 - Substance Abuse Prevention Education


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Completion of all 300 level HEAL courses (grade of “C” or better) and SOCI 312 (grade of “C” or better). The course provides the student with an overview of the etiological theories as well as the biological, psychological and social consequences of drug abuse in contemporary society. Current approaches to identification, treatment and prevention of drug abuse/chemical dependency are analyzed with an emphasis on effective educational approaches and prevention programs that address the problems of use and abuse. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HEAL 403 - Planning, Management and Evaluation of Health Education Programs


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 302 and PSYC/SOCI 301 or other approved statistics class (grade of C or better). The course prepares the student for program planning and evaluation responsibilities in health promotion settings. The course will focus on the basic planning model components of needs assessment, program design, administration, marketing and evaluation of community health education programs.
  
  • HEAL 410 - Capstone


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 303, HEAL 307, HEAL 401, HEAL 420, and HEAL 412. Taken in the final semester of the program, the course experience allows for synthesis of theories and knowledge from the arts, sciences, and health in order to refine critical thinking skills for designing and carrying out effective health education programs in a variety of healthcare and community settings in preparation for the CHES credentialing examination and the professional role. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • HEAL 416 - Spirituality, Health and Healing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the RN-BSN program OR HEAL 309 and PSYC/SOCI 301 or another approved statistics course (each with a grade of C or better). The course allows the student to explore the theme of healing with focus on the mind-body connection, as it intersects with faith, spirituality and faith communities. The opportunity for development and support of faith-based initiatives within community health promotion programs will be examined. Cross-listed with Nursing.
  
  • HEAL 420 - Implementing, Managing and Evaluating Health Education and Promotion Programs


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: HEAL 320. The course prepares the student for program administration, management, and evaluation techniques in health promotion programming. The course will focus on program implementation and intervention strategies, resource management, leadership and utilization of evaluation findings to assess and modify, if appropriate, program effectiveness and efficiency.
  
  • HEAL 421 - Introduction to Biostatistics


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: Math 105 or higher and HEAL 100. Corequisite: HEAL 421L. Statistical methods for description and analysis provide investigators in the health sciences with useful tools for making sense from data. The pervasiveness of statistics in the health sciences has led to increased recognition that statistical literacy-a familiarity with the goals and methods of statistics-should be a basic component of a well-rounded educational program. This course provides an introduction to the analysis of data in the health sciences using classification of data, measures of central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, comparison of means in one or more samples, correlation, simple regression, and non-parametric tests. Examples of health science concepts and data will be used to apply these techniques.
  
  • HEAL 421L - Introduction to Biostatistics Lab


    (0 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher and HEAL 100. Corequisite: HEAL 421. Statistical methods for description and analysis provide investigators in the health sciences with useful tools for making sense from data. The pervasiveness of statistics in the health sciences has led to increased recognition that statistical literacy-a familiarity with the goals and methods of statistics-should be a basic component of a well-rounded educational program. This course provides an introduction to the analysis of data in the health sciences using classification of data, measures of central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, comparison of means in one or more samples, correlation, simple regression, and non-parametric tests. Examples of health science concepts and data will be used to apply these techniques.
  
  • HEAL 469 - Public Health Internship


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: Majors with a GPA of 2.75 or higher; HEAL 320, HEAL 307, and HEAL 400 or permission of the chair and dean. Taken as an upper-level student in the program, internship creates a 120-hour field practiucum opportunity to apply principles of public health education and promotion in a selected government, school, clinical, non-profit, or community setting. Working with faculty and a preceptor, the student will become familiar with the operational and procedural aspects of health education, promotion, planning and application. Grading scale: Grading is not pass/fail but offered on a A-F scale. As with all major courses in HEAL, students must earn a C or better to complete. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Counts for ELR credit.

History

  
  • HIST 100 - History


    (3 hours) Designation reserved for elective credit received under the CLEP Program.
  
  • HIST 111 - Perspectives on World Civilizations I


    (3 hours) A survey of the major civilizations of the world from their origins to the ninth century AD. The course studies the interaction of cultural, social, political, economic and physical forces in shaping the classical and medieval civilizations of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. Note: All students placed in ENGL 099 must complete the course successfully before being allowed into History 111, 112, or 113.
  
  • HIST 112 - Perspectives on World Civilizations II


    (3 hours) A survey of the major civilizations of the world from the fifth century AD to the eighteenth century AD. The course studies the interaction of cultural, social, political, economic and physical forces in shaping the medieval and early modern civilizations of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. Note: All students placed in ENGL 099 must complete the course successfully before being allowed into History 111, 112, or 113.
  
  • HIST 113 - Perspectives on World Civilizations III


    (3 hours) The course studies the interaction of cultural, social, political, economic and physical forces in shaping the global community of the modern world from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Note: All students placed in ENGL 099 must complete the course successfully before being allowed into History 111, 112, or 113.
  
  • HIST 211 - American History I


    (3 hours) A study of the political, economic and social development of the United States, from the pre-Columbian period to the American Civil War.
  
  • HIST 212 - American History II


    (3 hours) A study of the political, economic and social development of the United States from the Reconstruction period, after the Civil War, to recent times.
  
  • HIST 275 - Innovation and the Modern West


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 111, 112 or 113. This course examines the contributions of technical and scientific innovation in shaping the contemporary Western world.  As a case-study based seminar, it employs classroom presentations and off-campus site visits to stimulate discussion of the dynamic interaction of ideas, inventions and events. Note: Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • HIST 304 - American Legal History


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 211, 212 or POLI 201. Prerequisite: HIST 211, HIST 212, or POLI 201.  This course will study the evolution of a distinct American body of law from the colonial period to the 20th century.  A special emphasis will be placed on examining the factors in American politics and society that shape the development of law, and how law in turn shapes American society and culture.  This course may be also be applied to Political Science majors and minors and Criminal Justice majors.
  
  • HIST 305 - The Frontier In American History


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 211. This course is a study of the changes in the American frontier from colonial settlement to the 20th century. It examines events the defined the frontier experience, and shows how the frontier experience in turn shaped American culture.
  
  • HIST 306 - America and the Cold War through Film


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112; HIST 211 or 212. This course will employ the medium of film as a prism through which to examine the diplomatic, cultural, and domestic political aspects of the American Cold War experience. The class will be largely seminar in style; discussion of films and assigned readings will be augmented by lecture.
  
  • HIST 311 - The Old South


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211. A survey of the history of the American South from settlement to the end of the Civil War, with special emphasis on political, economic and social development leading to the war.
  
  • HIST 312 - Traditional East Asia


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 111, 112 or 113. This course introduces students to pre-modern East Asia by examining the historical development of China, Japan and Korea from antiquity (around 1200 BC) to the end of the early modern era in AD 1800.
  
  • HIST 313 - History of Early Modern England


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 112. A study of the political, economic, and cultural development of England from the period of the Tudors through the Age of Reform.
  
  • HIST 314 - History of Modern Britian


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 111, 112 or 113 This course is a study of the political, economic and cultural development of Britain in the modern period.  It examines events effecting the growth and decay of the British Empire in the century and a half between the Napoleonic Wars and the Nuclear Age.
  
  • HIST 315 - Latin America


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 111, 113 or 211. A survey of modern Latin American history and culture beginning with a brief background study of earlier Spanish influences and native Indian cultures.
  
  • HIST 318 - African-American History


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 212. A study of the role of people of African descent in America from the Colonial period to the present with some attention given to the African background.
  
  • HIST 319 - The New South


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 212. A survey of the history of the South since the end of the Civil War with special emphasis on recent economic and political trends.
  
  • HIST 320 - History of South Carolina


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 212. Early explorations and grants, colonial society and government, independence era, participation in the Civil War and Reconstruction, and development in modern times.
  
  • HIST 327 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe (1347-1588)


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 112. The major developments in Europe from the beginning of the Renaissance, through the Reformation, Counter-Reformation to the origins of Absolutism.
  
  • HIST 328 - Europe in the Age of Transformation (1588-1789)


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 112. The major developments in Europe from the post-Reformation era, through the Age of Absolutism, the Enlightenment, and the Old Regime.
  
  • HIST 329 - Europe in the Age of Revolution (1789-1914)


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 112 or 113. The major developments in Europe from the French Revolution, through the Napoleonic Era, the Restoration, the Revolutions of 1830, 1848, 1870-71, the Rise of Nationalism, Imperialism, and Industrialization.
  
  • HIST 374 - Colonial History (1492-1756)


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211. A survey of the political, military, economic, social and cultural history of the Colonial Era, ending with the start of the Revolutionary period. A special emphasis will be placed on settlement patterns and the development of a distinct colonial mindset.
  
  • HIST 375 - The Young Republic (1756-1823)


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211. A study of the Revolutionary, Federalist, and Young Republic periods in American history, ending with the start of the Age of Jackson. A special emphasis will be placed on constitutional and territorial development of the United States.
  
  • HIST 376 - Antebellum America (1823-1860)


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211. An in-depth survey of the pre-Civil War period in American history, beginning with the Age of Jackson and examining political, social, geographic and economic development. A special emphasis will be placed on events and conditions leading up to the war.
  
  • HIST 377 - Civil War and Reconstruction


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211. The rise of opposition to slavery, the Decade of Crises, Civil War; political, social, economic diplomatic aspects of the Civil War. An examination of the Reconstruction period on the national and regional level.
  
  • HIST 378 - America in the Gilded Age (1865-1909)


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 212. An examination of the social, political, and economic forces and events shaping American society from the completion of the Civil War to the end of the Theodore Roosevelt administration.
 

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