May 24, 2024  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
  • CSCI 333 - Applied Systems


    (4 hours) Corequisite: CSCI 315. The application of program development, systems programming, shell programming, graphical user-Interfaces, and system management to a computer system (Linux, AS400, or other system). An introduction to assembly language programming. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 334 - User-Interface Programming


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 332. The fundamentals of user-interface design and programming. Using principles of human-computer interaction, the course teaches how to program within a windowing environment: object-oriented design techniques, forms, event-driven programming, multithreading, and network programming. Programming language and platform may vary. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 352 - Cyber Defense


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: CSCI 301. Cyber Defense explores the many facets of cyber security from the standpoint of defending against intrusion.  This includes identification of vulnerabilities, forms of attack, appropriate countermeasures, detection/defense, and many others.  Tools and techniques for the securing hardware, software, physical security, and social practices are explored.   The issues and facilities available to both the intruder and administrator will be examined and evaluated. (Laboratory fee required).
  
  • CSCI 360 - Intro to Mobile Application Development


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: CSCI 332. The goal of this course is to help students understand the basics of mobile device application development. Students are expected to be able to design Mobile Applications that are ready to publish. This course will give students the confidence and knowledge needed to jump into the mobile industry. Topics will cover Programming Language (Objective-C), Programming Environment (Xcode), Graphics, Sensors programming (Touch sensor, Accelerometers, GPS), User Interface Design, Networking and Database.

     

      Note: Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours (laboratory fee required).

  
  • CSCI 371 - Student-Directed Coursework in Computer Science


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: COIN 235 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, submission of proposed coursework to faculty supervisor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science 4 weeks prior to beginning of course, and approval of the Dept of Computer Science chair. This course will consist of computer science or information technology coursework completed off campus or online at a pre-approved training facility by pre-approved directed study instructors and supervisors. For each hour of credit to be granted, the student must receive 15 contact hours of instruction (or online equivalent), submit evidence of his/her projects/papers/labs, and provide a certificate of completion from the training facility. The faculty supervisor will determine if the stated course outcomes are sufficient for the coursework and will also review the qualifications of the instructing faculty member.  Note: This course is PASS/FAIL. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CSCI 372 - Student-Directed Coursework in Computer Science


    (2 hours) Prerequisites: COIN 235 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, submission of proposed coursework to faculty supervisor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science 4 weeks prior to beginning of course, and approval of the Dept of Computer Science chair. This course will consist of computer science or information technology coursework completed off campus or online at a pre-approved training facility by pre-approved directed study instructors and supervisors. For each hour of credit to be granted, the student must receive 15 contact hours of instruction (or online equivalent), submit evidence of his/her projects/papers/labs, and provide a certificate of completion from the training facility. The faculty supervisor will determine if the stated course outcomes are sufficient for the coursework and will also review the qualifications of the instructing faculty member Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CSCI 373 - Student-Directed Coursework in Computer Science


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: COIN 235 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, submission of proposed coursework to faculty supervisor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science 4 weeks prior to beginning of course, and approval of the Dept of Computer Science chair. This course will consist of computer science or information technology coursework completed off campus or online at a pre-approved training facility by pre-approved directed study instructors and supervisors. For each hour of credit to be granted, the student must receive 15 contact hours of instruction (or online equivalent), submit evidence of his/her projects/papers/labs, and provide a certificate of completion from the training facility. The faculty supervisor will determine if the stated course outcomes are sufficient for the coursework and will also review the qualifications of the instructing faculty member Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CSCI 374 - Student-Directed Coursework in Computer Science


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: COIN 235 with a grade of ‘C’ or better, submission of proposed coursework to faculty supervisor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science 4 weeks prior to beginning of course, and approval of the Dept of Computer Science chair. This course will consist of computer science or information technology coursework completed off campus or online at a pre-approved training facility by pre-approved directed study instructors and supervisors. For each hour of credit to be granted, the student must receive 15 contact hours of instruction (or online equivalent), submit evidence of his/her projects/papers/labs, and provide a certificate of completion from the training facility. The faculty supervisor will determine if the stated course outcomes are sufficient for the coursework and will also review the qualifications of the instructing faculty member. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CSCI 383 - Creative Teamwork


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course is designed to provide strategies for building and working in interdisciplinary teams. The students shall engage and interact with a community-based organization to develop and execute their project. Weekly team meetings/class sessions focus on teamwork skills such as communication, problem solving, conflict resolution as well as planning and delivery to the customer. The course is especially applicable for computer science, graphic design and business majors. Cross-listed with BUSI 383. CSCI=Parent. Note: Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CSCI 405 - Introduction to Cybersecurity


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 215, CSCI 217, or CSCI 235. This course provides an introductory examination into the founding principles and practices of Cybersecurity.  It provides the student with a solid foundation in which to approach and prosper in this ever-changing field.  Computer networks all throughout the world come under attack each day.  Students will be prepared to address these attacks and effectively protect their networks against future ones.  Ethical, legal and privacy issues will also be examined along with business continuity and contingency planning.  This course is intended for individuals who desire to work in the fields of Information Assurance, Computer Security, Cyber Forensics and Network Administration.

      Note: This course is cross listed with CRIM 405, (Parent = CRIM)

  
  • CSCI 409 - Fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence


    (4 hours) Prerequisite CSCI 315. This course introduces the fundamentals of artificial intelligence such as problem solving, knowledge representation, natural language processing, state-space search, and perception. Students will also learn the fundamentals of the LISP programming language, rule-based representation, and searching methods. While highly theoretical in nature, the student will participate in programming exercises in order to become proficient in the LISP programming language and enhance his/her understanding of the material. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 415 - Algorithms


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 315 (with grade of “C” or better). An introduction to the theory of computation including Nondeterministic Polynomial-time Problem, Computational Intractability, Turing Machines, Algorithm analysis, advanced algorithms and limits of computation. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 419 - Database Management


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: Students must have completed 12 hours in BUSI or CSCI 235 with a grade of “C” or better. This course examines how organizations use technology to manage data as an organizational resource. Students will learn to analyze an organization’s purpose and develop an information system that will meet the data needs of the organization. Topics include methods for accessing data requirements, developing a conceptual data design, translating that design into an operational information system, and administering and managing organizational data. Through student projects, students will apply concepts learned to an actual organization. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 431 - Operating Systems


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: CSCI 330 with a grade of “C” or better. Operating systems and file services, CPU scheduling, memory management and virtual memory, deadlocks and protection, concurrent processes and programming, and distributed systems. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 432 - Mobile and Wireless Networks


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: CSCI 332. Architecture and applications of advanced mobile and wireless networks. Top-down network layer concepts, network access technologies, mobility management, and quality of services in wireless internet networks. Investigation into mobile middleware that bridges wireless networks and the Internet. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 433 - Network Security


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 325 and 332. Network security foundations including sources of weakness in networks, methods for security in network communication, methods for protecting systems from network attacks, methods for detecting intrusions and appropriate responses to intrusions. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 434 - Human-Computer Interaction


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 334 and MATH 213. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is the study, design, and use of the interfaces that effectively allow humans (users) to perform tasks using computers. Focusing on the human, as opposed to the intricacies of the machine (software and hardware), the subject material of this class provides a unique perspective in computer science. An overview of theoretical principles and practical methods are discussed. These lessons are employed by students to design, implement, and evaluate user interfaces to address current real-world problems.  Cross listed with CSCI 534 (Parent = CSCI 434)
  
  • CSCI 435 - Computer Networks


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 325 and 332. An advanced course in networking; transmission media, layered system organization, routing algorithms, protocol theory, quality of service, security, Voice over IP. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 442 - Data Mining


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CCSI 419 and MATH 213. This course examines the use of database systems for knowledge discovery or data mining. Data mining refers to the ‘mining’ or discovery of information in terms of patterns or rules, generally over vast amounts of data. In this course we will cover the statistical underpinnings of data mining, including clustering, association rules, and classification rules. We will also look at Bayesian techniques, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. This knowledge will be applied to several data sets. Students will also participate in a semester long project involving the application of data mining, using either R Code or the SAS software package.
  
  • CSCI 450 - Graphics


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 315 and MATH 130. Topics include modeling systems, Geometric objects, transformation, 3D Viewing, Vector tools for Graphics, and Rendering tools using OpenGL with C++. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 452 - Network Penetration, Testing and Ethical Hacking


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: CSCI 332 and MATH 213. This course examines basic overview of network penetration, testing and ethical hacking. Various cyber security tools are used to test security on different Operating Systems, Social Engineering, Wifi security, exploiting passwords, basic computer security testing and exploits with the goal of being able to secure one’s computer. (Laboratory fee required).
  
  • CSCI 469 - Computer Science Internship


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: Computer Science major, 61 semester hours, 2.75 GPA, at least one semester as a CSU student, and permission of the Chair of the Department of Science. Qualified students may apply to the Chair of the Department of Computer Science in the semester before the intended start date for the internship. Students are required to complete the Internship Application and will be awarded an internship as available. Appointments are made on a competitive basis. An intern must work at least 150 hours over the course of the semester and complete a project or paper for his/her supervising professor in order to earn credit for this course. Note: Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CSCI 490 - Computer Science Exit Exam


    (0 hours) A comprehensive written exam requiring students to demonstrate a current knowledge of computer science and mathematics fundamentals covered in the degree program. The purpose of the exam is to: (1) motivate students to review and synthesize coursework, (2) determine students’ ability to understand and apply fundamental concepts, and (3) identify areas that need to be strengthened for the student to be successful post-graduation in computer-science related fields. Students must pass the exam during the senior project sequence (CSCI 397, CSCI 398, and CSCI 399). This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • CSCI 495 - Systems Analysis and Software Design


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CSCI 325 with a grade of “C” or better or CSCI 419 with a grade of “C” or better. Examines the overall business firm as a balanced decision-making supersystem of integrated subordinate subsystems. The concepts of information system planning, design and utilization are approached through recognized system development procedures. Case studies and simulation models are used to demonstrate the importance of effective business information processing systems. In addition, the course requires a team-based semester project involving an actual organization. (Laboratory fee required)
  
  • CSCI 496 - Senior Portfolio Review


    (0 hours) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The purpose of CSCI 496 Senior Portfolio Review is to determine if the student has the appropriate course depth in introductory CSCI coursework to begin his/her senior project series. The BS or BA student shall create a portfolio that must include: (1) at least three papers on ethical, legal, or social issues in computing, (2) at least four programs (one from each of CSCI 315, CSCI 325, CSCI 332,and CSCI 333), and (3) at least two presentations. In the case where courses were transferred and programs are no longer available, the faculty may ask for material from other classes. For our BT candidates, the Senior Portfolio Review determines whether the student has had adequate coursework in order to qualify for graduation. The BT student shall create a portfolio with (1) at least one paper on ethical, legal, or social issues in computing, and (2) at least two programs from CSCI courses. The BT advisor for the student shall review the portfolio to determine that it is adequate depth for consideration for graduation. Course grade is Pass/Fail. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • CSCI 497 - Senior Project Design


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. The first of a project-based capstone series. Student will complete the design of a significant project which is usually planned during the prerequisite course. Student will be guided by an assigned instructor. The project ultimately will be defended orally during the final course in the capstone series. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • CSCI 498 - Senior Project Construction


    (1 hours) Prerequisite. CSCI 497 with a grade of “C” or better. The second of a project-based capstone series. Student will complete construction of a significant project which was designed in the first of the capstone series. Student will be guided by an assigned instructor. The project ultimately will be defended orally during the final course in the capstone series. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • CSCI 499 - Senior Project Implementation/Defense


    (1 hours) Prerequisite: CSCI 498 with a grade of “C” or better. The last in a project-based capstone series. Must be taken as the student’s final CSCI requirement in the major. Student will implement the project under the guidance of an assigned instructor, then defend it before a panel of student peers, faculty and others. Requires assimilation of the skills, tools, techniques, and theory learned in the total university experience. Defense includes an examination of the students’ entire computer science knowledge and a presentation of their final portfolio. Failure to demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of computer science or failure to demonstrate professional programming and analysis skills will cause the student to fail this capstone course. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged. Note: Counts for ELR credit.

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRIM 210 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) An introduction to Criminal Justice, including philosophical background, history, constitutional limits, agencies, processes of justice, and evaluation of current criminal justice practices.
  
  • CRIM 212 - Techniques of Criminal Investigations


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of investigative techniques used in crime scene analysis. These include but are not limited to, examination of questioned documents, fingerprint techniques, polygraph examinations, firearms identifications ballistics, toxicology, pathology, interrogation and interviewing, and photography.
  
  • CRIM 227 - Critical Thinking and Writing in Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 and ENGL 111. An introductory overview of basic research methods and writing for the criminal justice student. Attention will be given to online and traditional avenues of research, as well as standard formats for case briefs and police investigative documents.
  
  • CRIM 232 - Current Issues and Trends in Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. This course provides an examination of the current issues and trends within the criminal justice system. The student will develop an up-to-date awareness of activities within today’s criminal justice system in the areas of police, courts, and corrections. Integration of faith from both a contemporary and biblical perspective will be intertwined in the definition of Justice.
  
  • CRIM 246 - Constitutional and Legal Issues for Law Enforcement


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210.  

    This course was developed based on the need for aspiring and current police officers to develop an in-depth comprehension of the Federal and Constitutional statutes regarding search and seizure, arrests, and stops.  Curriculum from the Legal instructional block of the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy was reviewed and integrated into many modules.  The course was developed by an attorney with more than 30 years experience in South Carolina statutes.

  
  • CRIM 255 - Introduction to Private Security


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. Examines private security theories, operations, and practices, with an emphasis on the administration and management of security.  Explores the philosophical background, history, and current role of private security, as well as the role and status of the security manager in threat assessment, risk prevention, and the protection of assets.  Discusses functional area security systems; law, science, and technology for security; and standards, goals, and challenges for the future.  Explores security systems, particularly as they relate to criminal justice and the environment.
  
  • CRIM 275 - Introduction to Conservation Law Enforcement


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. The Goal of this course is to familiarize the student with the daily responsibilities of the Wildlife Law Enforcement Officer and to promote a greater understanding of his/her role in the criminal justice system.
  
  • CRIM 312 - Advanced Criminal Investigative Techniques


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 and 212. This is an advanced level course for Criminal Justice majors and minors. The focus of the class will be to combine the art of investigation with the science of criminalistics.  Advances in forensics have vastly changed the criminal investigative process, and this course will integrate academic and applied approaches to advance the development of criminal investigative techniques for the undergraduate student. Laboratory fee required.
  
  • CRIM 340 - Introduction to International Terrorism


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 and junior/senior status. This course will define terrorism as well as identify and explore the various international terrorist organizations. The course will also examine the relatively new phenomena known as Homeland Security by visiting the aspects of Counter Terrorism and Anti-Terrorism as it applies to the criminal justice discipline.
  
  • CRIM 361 - Criminal Law


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210 or POLI 201. A study of substantive crimes and their punishment, special defenses, inchoate and group criminality, and limitations of the criminal law. Appropriate attention is given to distinguishing aspects of South Carolina criminal law. Cross-listed under Political Science. (Criminal Justice = Parent)
  
  • CRIM 362 - Criminal Procedure


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210. An examination of procedural steps from investigation through arrest, conviction, and appeal, with special emphasis on the constitutional guarantees protecting citizens and the accused and how those constitutional guarantees affect law enforcement practices and the judicial process. May be used for major/minor credit for Criminal Justice. Cross-listed under Political Science. (Criminal Justice = Parent)
  
  • CRIM 365 - Police Administration


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of policymaking and administration within law enforcement agencies in the United States, including an examination of organizational structure and behavior, personnel management, budgeting, and the role of police agencies within the greater governmental bureaucracy.
  
  • CRIM 374 - Police Systems and Practices


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of the origins, goals, methods, and effectiveness of police systems at the national, state and local levels in the United States, coupled with a comparison of these systems with those in place in other nations.
  
  • CRIM 376 - Judicial Systems and Practices


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of the structure, organization, and policies of the federal and state court systems. The application of both criminal and civil law will be discussed.
  
  • CRIM 378 - Prison Systems and Practices


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of correctional systems and their relationships with other components of the criminal justice system from a management and administration perspective. Also analyzed, within the context of local, state, and federal correctional systems, are policies relating to sentencing, classification, custody, prison demographics, programs, and services.
  
  • CRIM 400 - Criminology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: SOCI 101 or CRIM 210. A study of crime, delinquency, and the mechanisms of social control. Cross-listed under Sociology. (Sociology = Parent)
  
  • CRIM 401 - Theories of Crime and Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of the historical development of the criminal justice system and a critical examination of contemporary theories and practices utilized to achieve justice.
  
  • CRIM 402 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210 and 227. A study of research methods used in the discipline of criminal justice. Topics of study include; scientific method, causation and validity, research designs, measurement, operationalization, data collection, sampling, ethics and research, survey research, field research, secondary data analysis, evaluation research, policy analysis and data management using SPSS.
  
  • CRIM 403 - Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 and 227. An examination of ethical and moral philosophies and various ethical dilemmas faced by law enforcement, judicial, and correctional personnel. The class serves as the capstone course for the Criminal Justice Department.
  
  • CRIM 405 - Introduction to Cybersecurity


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210. This course provides an introductory examination into the founding principles and practices of Cybersecurity.  It provides the student with a solid foundation in which to approach and prosper in this ever-changing field.  Computer networks all throughout the world come under attack each day.  Students will be prepared to address these attacks and effectively protect their networks against future ones.  Ethical, legal and privacy issues will also be examined along with business continuity and contingency planning.  This course is intended for individuals who desire to work in the fields of Information Assurance, Computer Security, Cyber Forensics and Network Administration. Note: This course is cross listed with CSCI 405. (Parent = CRIM)
  
  • CRIM 421 - Constitutional Law I


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201 or CRIM 210. Examination of the establishment of the Supreme Court’s power of judicial review, the scope and limits of the powers of the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the national government, and the relationship of the national government to the states. Will count as a major or minor elective in Criminal Justice. Cross-listed under Political Science. (Political Science = Parent)
  
  • CRIM 422 - Constitutional Law II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201 or CRIM 210. Analysis of the judicial interpretation of the Bill of Rights emphasizing the First Amendment: the establishment and free exercise of religion, the freedom of speech, press, and assembly; and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment: equal protection of racial, sexual, political and economic groups. Cross-listed under Political Science. (Political Science = Parent)
  
  • CRIM 423 - Drugs And The Criminal Justice System


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 and 227. This is an introductory course that provides basic information about the problems of alcohol and other drug abuse in society.  We will explore the symptoms and effects of abuse and dependency on individuals, families, organizations and institutions within the Criminal Justice System. 
  
  • CRIM 431 - Juvenile Justice System


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of cultural and governmental philosophy relating to society’s response to juvenile crime and behavior, including an analysis of typical juvenile justice systems in the United States.
  
  • CRIM 433 - Juvenile Deliquency


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 or SOCI 101. This course offers an overview of sociological theory and research on juvenile delinquency in society. The course will immerse the students in the theoretical trends, empirical debate, policy discussion, and justice issues surrounding juvenile delinquency. Cross-listed with SOCI 433. SOCI= Parent.
  
  • CRIM 435 - Forensic Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110, CRIM 210 plus 9 additional PSYC hours OR by permission of the instructor. This course is designed to introduce students to the application of psychology within the legal and criminal justice systems. Students will be introduced to the roles and responsibilities of psychologists working within the and in conjunction with these systems. Areas of focus include forensic psychological assessments, expert testimony, correctional psychology, and offender treatment. Students’ knowledge of and ability to think critically about psychology in the legal and criminal justice systems will be increased. Cross listed with Psychology. (Parent= Psychology).
  
  • CRIM 440 - Protection Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 and 374.  

    This course includes an overview of management techniques for establishing and maintaining security and loss prevention programs with the goal of protecting organizations from crimes, fires, and accidents. Emphasis is placed on protection as a “profit center” rather than a “cost center.”

  
  • CRIM 450 - Organized Crime


    (3 hours) CRIM 210 or POLI 201. This course is designed to deal with the issues surrounding the phenomenon of organized crime.  The students will be exposed to history, theories, concepts and issues related to organized crime.  An attempt will be made to improve students’ understanding of the problem of organized crime against the background of contemporary international paradigms.  General concepts of organized crime will be explored as will many of the events, groups and persons who have been involved historically.  Students will explore the role of organized crime in the 21st century and examine the problems of responding to and controlling organized crime.
  
  • CRIM 455 - Homeland Security


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210 and junior/senior status. This course will define the relatively new criminal justice field of Homeland Security as well as identify and explore the definition of terrorism. The course will also visit the aspects of Counter Terrorism and Anti-Terrorism as it applies to the criminal justice discipline. 

     

  
  • CRIM 463 - Community-Based Corrections


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of the governmental philosophy relating to correctional methods centered in and involving the offender’s community, and an examination of the origins, goals, methods, and effectiveness of existing community-based correctional systems and practices.
  
  • CRIM 465 - Police and Community Relations


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210. A study of the interaction between law enforcement agencies and the communities which they serve, including an analysis of community perceptions of police, police perceptions of the community, public relations and sensitivity awareness, and techniques and policies best adapted to healthy police/community relations. Cross listed with CRIM 565.
  
  • CRIM 469 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, and a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the Criminal Justice major or minor. Applicants must have completed a minimum of 61 semester hours, to include CRIM 210 and 374. All internships must be approved by the department chairperson. This course requires 112 hours of supervised participation in a criminal justice agency. Arrangements for assignments, work hours, and working conditions must meet with the mutual satisfaction of the student, the supervising professor, the department chairperson, and the agency. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. This course may only be taken by students pursuing a Criminal Justice major or minor, unless special permission is granted by the department chairperson. Only three credit hours of internship credit may be applied to a major or minor in Criminal Justice. Any student registering for a second internship will register using course number 470, and the earned credit will count as general elective only. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CRIM 470 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, and a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the Criminal Justice major or minor. Applicants must have completed a minimum of 61 semester hours, to include CRIM 210 and 374. All internships must be approved by the department chairperson. This course requires 112 hours of supervised participation in a criminal justice agency. Arrangements for assignments, work hours, and working conditions must meet with the mutual satisfaction of the student, the supervising professor, the department chairperson, and the agency. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. This course may only be taken by students pursuing a Criminal Justice major or minor, unless special permission is granted by the department chairperson. Only three credit hours of internship credit may be applied to a major or minor in Criminal Justice. Any student registering for a second internship will register using course number 470, and the earned credit will count as general elective only. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • CRIM 499 - Honors Project in Criminal Justice


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Completion of at least 90 semester hours of acceptable credit, at least a 3.5 GPA in Criminal Justice major or minor, at least a 3.0 GPA overall, and permission of the department chairperson. This course presents an opportunity for a superior Criminal Justice student to pursue advanced study. A faculty supervisor will be appointed to work with the student in developing and pursuing a scholarly, individual study of a selected Criminal Justice topic.

Business for CAPS

  
  • ECBA 200 - Student Success and Christian Worldview in Online Learning


    (3 hours) CAPS students only. Designed to address the questions of many students new to online learning, the Student Success Online course provides numerous self-assessments and inventories to help students evaluate their readiness for online learning. Best practices for interacting online and maximizing the tools provided by the student’s Learning Management System (LMS) are demonstrated using discussions, interactive examples, and simulations. Tips for success with online study skills are provided from a real-world real-student perspective. The principles presented are applied to specific CSU Online standards that are designed for early and continuing student success. An emphasis is placed in the course on the vision of the University to integrate faith in learning, leading and serving through a specific lesson on Christian worldview.
  
  • ECBA 201 - Legal Environment of Business


    (3 hours) An introduction to law and the legal system as it influences business decisions. The course focuses on describing governmental regulation from both state and federal regulatory agencies and the legal issues that affect a variety of business situations.
  
  • ECBA 202 - Accounting Principles for Managers


    (3 hours) Accounting is called the language of business. The purpose of accounting is to provide information in a timely, accurate and ethical manner. It is a measurement discipline. This course will emphasize financial accounting concepts by surveying and analyzing financial tools available to the manager in decision making.
  
  • ECBA 222 - Business Law I


    (3 hours) This course introduces the multiple facets of business law, including online commerce. The course emphasizes the basic concepts of how businesses are organized and operate within a legal environment.
  
  • ECBA 223 - Business Law II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: ECBA 222. This course represents a continuation of Business Law I and further examines the multiple facets of business law, including online commerce. The course emphasizes the basic concepts of how businesses are organized and operate within a business environment.
  
  • ECBA 301 - Principles of Management


    (3 hours) Decision making about the planning, organizing, staffing, and control of organizations.
  
  • ECBA 303 - Business Finance for Managers


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: ECBA 202 Principles of managing capital in a business firm.
  
  • ECBA 307 - Business Communications


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an applied broad overview of business communications to include the development, analysis and appropriate delivery mechanisms and evaluation associated with business communications. This will include many written forms of business communication to include emails, memos, offer letters, business proposals and presentations.
  
  • ECBA 308 - Marketing & Advertising


    (3 hours) A study of the processes and procedures used in developing and utilizing a strategic marketing and advertising campaign for regional and global markets. The course focuses on addressing the definition of marketing and the role played by marketing in the economy. An examination of the applied and theoretical aspects of advertising decisions will be presented throughout the course. The student will learn how to differentiate between the alternative concepts under which organizations conduct marketing activities, develop advertising themes and producing a multimedia advertising and marketing plan will be an essential part of the course requirements. A review of how culture impacts advertising and marketing will also be examined.
  
  • ECBA 309 - Entrepreneurship


    (3 hours) This course will concentrate on developing all aspects of a small business or entrepreneurship with an emphasis on the entrepreneurial spirit in various businesses and not-for-profit associations.
  
  • ECBA 401 - Business Ethics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECBA 301. This course is designed to provide the student with a basis for making business decisions within the framework of social responsibilities, law, and societal customs, values, and beliefs. An examination of business activities and their community impact will be analyzed in detail.
  
  • ECBA 402 - Human Resources Management


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECBA 301. Hiring, training, evaluating, compensating, and maintaining a firm’s human resources.
  
  • ECBA 403 - Organizational Behavior


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECBA 301. This course will explore the field of organizational behavior with particular emphasis on the integration of theory and practice from a managerial perspective.  This course will also investigate the role of communication in creating a productive organizational environment.
  
  • ECBA 404 - International Business


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECEC 203 and 204. A study of the international business environment including the nature of multinational corporations and their management, the assessment of foreign business environments as to regulations, laws, culture, and profit opportunities, and operations of international transactions.
  
  • ECBA 406 - Business Policy


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Senior standing. (Should be taken in the final term of the degree.) May be taken with other major requirements as determined by CAPS advisors. Capstone course designed to integrate and utilize concepts from the core business courses in the solution of practical business problems. This course cannot be challenged.

Economics for CAPS

  
  • ECEC 203 - Principles of Microeconomics


    (3 hours) An introductory study of the parts of the economy including consumers, firms, industries, and markets. Firm pricing and resource allocation.
  
  • ECEC 204 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    (3 hours) An introduction to the economy as a whole. National income, employment, prices and inflation, and output in an economic system. Problems in controlling and forecasting economic fluctuations.
  
  • ECEC 205 - Statistics for Managers


    (3 hours) Development of fundamental statistical concepts and their relationship to business and economic analysis.

Economics

  
  • ECON 211 - Principles of Microeconomics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 110 (or higher) and ENGL 111. An introductory study of the parts of the economy including consumers, firms, industries, and markets. Firm pricing and resource allocation.
  
  • ECON 212 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 110 (or higher) and ENGL 111. An introduction to the economy as a whole. National income, employment, prices and inflation, and output in an economic system. Problems in controlling and forecasting economic fluctuations.
  
  • ECON 224 - Business and Economics Statistics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 105 (or higher) and CSCI 209 (or higher). Development of fundamental statistical concepts and their relationship to business and economic analysis.
  
  • ECON 311 - Money and Banking


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212 (grades of “C” or better). Operation of U.S. commercial and central banking system, including monetary theory and monetary policy.
  
  • ECON 314 - International Trade


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212 (grades of “C” or better). Principles and practices of international economic relations including basis for specialization and trade, balance of payments, problems of International finance and investments. Implications for multinational firm.
  
  • ECON 315 - History of Economic Thought


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212 (grades of “C” or better). Evolution of the important theories of economics from the era of the Greek philosophers to present.
  
  • ECON 326 - Public Policy


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212, (grades of “C” or better). Activities of the federal and state governments in the promotion and regulation of private enterprise.
  
  • ECON 331 - Economic Development


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212, (grades of “C” or better). Examination of theories and issues related to developing a nation’s economy. Economic growth and social change in Asian, African, and Latin American countries. Maintenance of economic growth in advanced nations.
  
  • ECON 412 - Labor Economics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212 (grades of “C” or better). Analysis of labor market operations. Occupational choice, investment in human capital, governmental policies affecting labor.
  
  • ECON 414 - Public Finance


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212 (grades of “C” or better). Public expenditures, various types of government revenues, public credit, and governmental financial administration.
  
  • ECON 421 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 (grades of “C” or better) and MGMT 330. Advanced theory of the firm and consumer behavior.
  
  • ECON 422 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 212 (grade of “C” or better) and MATH 111. Advanced theory and issues related to the economy as a whole.
  
  • ECON 451 - Comparative Economics Systems


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212 (grades of “C” or better). Comparative and analytical study of the principal economics systems of the modern world including among others, capitalism and socialism.
  
  • ECON 452 - Managerial Economics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ECON 211, 212 (grades of “C” or better), and MATH 111 . Application of economic principles in making organizational decisions under conditions of uncertainty.
  
  • ECON 469 - Economics Internship


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: 61 semester hours, 2.75 GPA, and permission of the department chairperson. Qualified students may apply to the School of Business Internship Committee for internship positions. Appointments are made on a competitive basis. Only six hours may be earned. Three Business (BUSI) or Economics (ECON) internship hours may be applied in major or minor (but not both) and three hours of general elective credit. An intern must work at least 112 hours to receive credit. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • ECON 470 - Economics Internship


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: 61 semester hours, 2.75 GPA, and permission of the department chairperson. Qualified students may apply to the School of Business Internship Committee for internship positions. Appointments are made on a competitive basis. Only six hours may be earned. Three Business (BUSI) or Economics (ECON) internship hours may be applied in major or minor (but not both) and three hours of general elective credit. An intern must work at least 112 hours to receive credit. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • ECON 471 - Senior Project in Economics


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: Senior status, GPA above 3.0, and permission of the chair. The Senior Project is a substantial independent project and may include various models, ranging from traditional readings and academic writing, to field studies, experiments, or business plans.  Senior Projects will involve a substantial amount of research and provide an enhancement to the capstone experience for the student’s curriculum.
  
  • ECON 472 - Senior Project in Economics


    (2 hours) Prerequisites: Senior status, GPA above 3.0, and permission of the chair. The Senior Project is a substantial independent project and may include various models, ranging from traditional readings and academic writing, to field studies, experiments, or business plans.  Senior Projects will involve a substantial amount of research and provide an enhancement to the capstone experience for the student’s curriculum.
  
  • ECON 473 - Senior Project in Economics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Senior status, GPA above 3.0, and permission of the chair. The Senior Project is a substantial independent project and may include various models, ranging from traditional readings and academic writing, to field studies, experiments, or business plans.  Senior Projects will involve a substantial amount of research and provide an enhancement to the capstone experience for the student’s curriculum.

Education

  
  • EDUC 101 - Introduction to Education


    (3 hours) An introduction to the field of education focusing on the learner, the teacher and teaching, the school, and current trends in education. Intended for honors level high school students participating in a teacher cadet program. Extended observations and field experiences at various school levels are required. This course cannot be challenged.
 

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