Jun 16, 2024  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Education

  
  • EDUC 201 - Principles and Philosophy of Education


    (3 hours) A survey of past and current practices, trends, and issues in public education stressing historical and philosophical antecedents to modern education. Includes a study of education organization, finance, law, and administration, as well as current employment outlooks in the field of education. Teaching Fellows and Teacher Cadet students are enrolled in specific section.  A 12-hour practicum is required and 3 hours volunteer work in the community, church or campus. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 219 - Foundations of Literacy


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: EDUC 201 (grade of “C” or better). Specific methods of literacy instruction will be studied and demonstrated with analysis and evaluation of materials/strategies used in comprehensive P-12 literacy education. Major emphasis will be given to the 5 components of a scientifically researched reading program: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension. Attention will be given to current research findings and their implications to teaching literacy.  This course will examine theoretical basis and practical techniques for teaching reading in the classroom to facilitate student’s mastery of reading as a vital component in becoming a lifelong learner. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring
  
  • EDUC 221 - Technology for Teachers


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: EDUC 201 (grade of C or better) and a GPA of at least 2.0. May be taken with Education 201 with permission of advisor. This course will explore the present and potential use of technology in the world of K-12 education and will employ technology as a primary instructional tool. Students will examine classroom applications of interactive whiteboards, word-processing, spreadsheet, and database programs. Students will utilize technology to create computer-based multimedia instructional and informational presentations. The use of the internet for professional and instructional purposes and software for educational purposes will also be explored. (Laboratory fee required) A 4-hour practicum is required. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 300 - Psychology Applied to Effective Teaching


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: EDUC 201 (grade of “C” or better) or approval from School of Education. A review of the major contributions of psychology as applied in the educational setting. Emphasis on developmental aspects of human learning, with particular focus on stages of development, learning theories, and their practical application, effective instruction and classroom management, development of critical thinking skills, and evaluation of student learning. A component on South Carolina school evaluation procedures is included. A 12-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 310 - Early Childhood Content, Curriculum and Assessment


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher EDUC Program and EDUC 390, 391 and 423. Candidates are given the opportunity to match content, objectives, and teaching behaviors with appropriate curriculum and assessment for early childhood education models and programs (infancy through grade three).  Meeting the needs of the child are addressed through the study of the role of ethnicity, physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development in growth and learning style, with emphasis on the individual child. The ADEPT teacher evaluation model is presented in the course and candidates develop an integrated unit work sample. Candidates will also select, interpret, and integrate developmentally appropriate assessment tools which meet the needs of diverse student populations. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 313 - Human Growth and Child Development


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: EDUC 201 (grade of “C” or better). An investigation of various patterns of intellectual, social, emotional, and physical growth of learners from prenatal through adult periods.  Theories and content emphasizing current thinking and research are examined, as well as the processes affecting the developing person. Special emphasis is given to the P-12 student and child development. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 324 - Creativity in the Classroom


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: EDUC 300 (grade of “C” or better) or approval from School of Education. Emphasis upon methods, materials, and activities for enhancing creative and critical thinking through the integration of art, music, and drama into the regular classroom curriculum. A 5 hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered:Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 325 - Teaching Reading/Writing in the Content Areas


    (3 hours) Prerequisites for EC/ELEM: EDUC 300 (grade of “C” or better). Prerequisites for Middle/Secondary/P-12: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Elementary and Early Childhood Education majors must take section 01 and Middle Grades, Secondary and P-12 majors must take section 02. A study of strategies for the improvement of literacy skills in the content areas using development content-specific activities and materials. Emphasis will be given to identifying learner needs and planning instructional delivery with varied pupil groupings, along with the use of assessment, enrichment and remediation ideas and techniques for applying reading and writing skills in the content areas. Some focus will be given to creative/critical thinking skills the utilization of technology for instruction. Each course section will also emphasize the importance of children’s literature or adolescent literature. For EC/ELEM: a 5 hour practicum is required; For Middle/Secondary: a 20 hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: For EC/ELEM: Fall and Spring; For Middle/Secondary & P-12: Spring Only.
  
  • EDUC 327 - Literature Across the Curriculum


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: EDUC 201 (grade of “C” or better), GPA of at least 2.0, Declaration of Intent to Seek Certification or approval from School of Education . This course provides a survey of children’s literature appropriate for the early childhood, elementary, and middle grades, including: animal books, bibliography, biography, Caldecott Award winners, chapter books, counting and number books, easy readers, juvenile novels, nature and science books, multicultural books, Newberry Award winners, poetry, phonics-driven books, and value and character building books. Students will have the opportunity to develop and present activities for using books in drama, story-telling, and other creative teaching venues. The course will emphasize the importance of children’s literature in critical thinking, building values, and developing a lifelong love of reading. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 332 - Instructional Strategies/Reading


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admittance to Teacher Education program. Corequisites: For Early Childhood: EDUC 332, 390, and 423; For Elementary: EDUC 332 and 423. EDUC 332 is a study of instructional methods and strategies for teaching reading and ELA in the early childhood and elementary school classrooms. Major emphasis will be given to the 5 components of a scientifically researched reading program: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension. Attention will be given to current research findings and their implications on teaching reading and writing.  This course will examine theoretical basis and practical techniques for teaching reading and ELA in the primary classroom to facilitate children’s mastery of reading as a vital component in becoming a lifelong learner. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • EDUC 338 - Teaching Math in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of MATH 201 and MATH 202 with a “C” or better. This course is an introduction to early childhood and elementary mathematics curriculum and instructional strategies. Emphasis is placed on the following: NCTM, South Carolina and local standards, effective planning and instruction for all students, how children learn mathematics, available resources including technology, literature and manipulatives; and acquiring experience in a local school. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 340 - Nature and Needs of the Middle Level Student


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. This course is designed to develop an in-depth understanding of the specific nature of early adolescence, the specific needs of young adolescents and the importance of collaborating with families and the entire community. Course content includes the social, emotional, physical and psychosocial development and needs of early adolescent. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • EDUC 341 - Middle Level Curriculum and Organization


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. A study of middle level organization and curriculum design that is developmentally appropriate for middle level students.  Specific topics include interdisciplinary teaching teams, flexible grouping and scheduling, vertical articulation, activity and advisory programs, and community building.  Based on the AMLE Standard 2, this course will provide middle level teacher candidates with an understanding and use of the central concepts, standards, research, and structures of content to plan and implement curriculum that develops all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and evaluate challenging, developmentally responsive curriculum that results in meaningful learning outcomes. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • EDUC 380 - Strategies for Planning Curriculum and Assessment


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of EDUC 391, EDUC 332 and EDUC 423 with a “C” or better. Corequisities: EDUC 412, 413 and 421. Should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Candidates are provided the opportunity to match content, objectives, and teaching behaviors with appropriate curriculum and assessment. The ADEPT instrument for teacher evaluation is presented in the course and candidates develop an integrated unit work sample based on this model. Candidates will also select, interpret, and integrate assessment tools that are developmentally appropriate and which meet the needs of diverse student populations. A 10 hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 381 - Strategies for Planning Secondary Curriculum and Assessment


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of EDUC 325 and 361 with a grade of ‘C’ or better. Corequisite: EDUC 422 and appropriate secondary content area curriculum and methods course. Should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. This course prepares teachers to analyze, design, and construct developmentally appropriate traditional and authentic assessments for secondary classrooms. The relationship among state academic standards, assessment and ADEPT is discussed. Candidates analyze student data, and modify assessments to meet the needs of diverse learners. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 390 - Early Childhood Practicum


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program unless a Child Development major. Corequisites: EDUC 332, 391 and 423. This course is designed to teach students to apply theory and research related to early childhood learners including preschool with emphasis on the whole child. Candidates enrolled in this course will be trained in the domains of early childhood development using both NAEYC and South Carolina guidelines including emphasis on speech and language development. Candidates will apply this knowledge to guide their observations in early childhood practicum settings. Candidates will become advocates for young children as they reflect upon observations and outside readings. Multiple practicum hours in various settings are required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Spring.
  
  • EDUC 391 - Early Childhood/Elementary Social Studies Content


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Corequisites: For Early Childhood: EDUC 332, 390, and 423; For Elementary: EDUC 332 and 423. This course is designed to provide the teacher candidate with sufficient content knowledge in the core social studies strands needed for teaching in early childhood and elementary school settings. Content mastery in history, geography, economics, behavioral science, and political science is essential in preparing teachers to provide meaningful social studies experiences for early childhood and elementary students. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Note: Offered: Spring
  
  • EDUC 405 - School, Parent, and Community Relations


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Analysis and discussion of the interrelationship of parents, the school, and the community. The involvement of parents and their role in the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of children, and how the role of the school and the involvement of the community impact the educational process will be specifically examined. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.
  
  • EDUC 412 - Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; for Early Childhood: EDUC 332, 390, 391 and 423; for Elementary: EDUC 332, 391 and 423. Corequisites: For Early Childhood: EDUC 310, 413 and 420; For Elementary: EDUC 380, 413 and 421. This course prepares teachers to select, develop, and instruct curricula in the strands of early childhood/elementary social studies. These curricular areas will be applied so that candidates will be able to use developmentally appropriate practice, technology, multiple resources, integrated instruction and hands-on experiences as they prepare for social studies methods in the classroom. The ADEPT evaluation model, state standards, and national standards for social studies will be used in the course for the purposes of discussion, analysis, and design of lesson plans. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 413 - Teaching Science in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; for Early Childhood: EDUC 332, 390, 391 and 423; for Elementary: EDUC 332, 391 and 423. Corequisites: For Early Childhood: EDUC 310, 412 and 420; For Elementary: EDUC 380, 412 and 421. This course promotes a practical “hands-on” learning approach for teaching science in the early childhood/elementary classroom. Emphasis is on direct and inquiry-oriented instructional methods for encouraging discovery learning, divergent thinking and creative problem-solving among early childhood and elementary students. Specific abilities and strategies are demonstrated by designing and implementing an inquiry based approach to the biological, geological, physical, and environmental sciences in the classroom. A clinical experience is required. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 417 - Creating a Learning Environment


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of Education 325 with a “C” or better. Study and practical application of assessment and classroom management methods and materials focusing on preparing teacher candidates to be reflective decision-makers. The course prepares teachers to analyze, design, and construct developmentally appropriate traditional and authentic assessments.  Case studies requiring problem solving are emphasized. The relationship between state academic standards, assessment, classroom management and ADEPT is discussed. Further emphasis is placed on developing positive relationships and communication with parents, peers, and administrators. A 20-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 420 - Methods and Materials for Early Childhood Classroom


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of EDUC 332, 390, 391 and 423 with a “C” or better. Corequisites: EDUC 310, 412 and 413. This course should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Study and practical application of content, methods, and materials for early childhood education, with emphases on diverse teaching strategies, effective instruction, classroom management, accommodations for diverse learners, and effective technology integration. Special emphasis placed on methods and strategies for developing creative and critical thinking skills through interdisciplinary learning center approaches and hands-on programs. The ADEPT teacher evaluation instrument is presented in the course and candidates develop long range plans based on this model. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 421 - Methods for Classroom Management and Effective Instruction in the Elementary School


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of EDUC 332, 391 and 423 with a “C” or better. Corequisites: EDUC 380, 412 and 413. This should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. This course should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Study and practical application of content, methods, and materials for elementary education, with emphases on diverse teaching strategies, effective instruction, classroom management, accommodations for diverse learners, and effective technology integration. This course offers candidates the opportunity to study and apply educational philosophies and multiple perspectives of a variety of classroom management approaches leading to a classroom management plan and model for classroom discipline. The ADEPT teacher evaluation instrument is presented in the course and candidates develop long range plans based on this model. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 423 - Assessment Strategies/Reading


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Corequisites: For Early Childhood: EDUC 332, 390, and 391; For Elementary: EDUC 332 and 391. This course is a study of assessing and addressing the literacy needs and performance of students in grades P-6, based on performance data, personal background, individual learning styles, and classroom behavior. Candidates demonstrate the ability to assess the progress of individual students as well as that of the class as a whole by collecting data and making data driven decisions for individuals and program improvement. Candidates employ multiple measures for determining student growth and understanding and can clearly explain student performance to parents (through the use of data). Best practices in reading and language arts as well as recommended practices for traditional and authentic assessment will be addressed. A 10-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Spring
  
  • EDUC 425 - Secondary English Curriculum and Methods


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and EDUC 325 and SPED 361 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisites: Education 417. Should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Study of secondary English curriculum and methods. Emphasis on planning for instruction, instructional strategies, and integrating listening, speaking, reading, and writing throughout the English curriculum. Examination of the South Carolina curriculum standards for Reading/English/Language Arts as well as research findings regarding effective teaching strategies in the English/Language Arts classroom. National and state standards are emphasized. Using the Expanded ADEPT Evaluation System candidates will construct long - and short - range plans.  A 20-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 426 - Secondary Mathematics Curriculum and Methods


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and EDUC 325 and SPED 361 with a grade of “C” of better. Corequisites: Education 417. Study of secondary mathematics curriculum and methods. Emphasis on planning for instruction and instructional strategies in the secondary mathematics classroom. Additional emphasis on the history of mathematics. Examination of the national and South Carolina frameworks and curriculum standards for mathematics as well as research findings regarding effective teaching strategies in the secondary mathematics classroom. National and state standards are emphasized. Using the Expanded ADEPT Evaluation System candidates will construct a long-range plan and unit work sample. A 20-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 428 - Secondary Life Science Curriculum and Methods


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and EDUC 325 and SPED 361 with a grade of “C” of better. Study of secondary life science curriculum and methods. Emphasis on planning for instruction, instructional strategies, and integrating listening, speaking, reading, and writing throughout the sciences curricula. Examination of the South Carolina curriculum standards for teaching science at the secondary level as well as research findings regarding effective teaching strategies in the secondary sciences classroom were researched to develop strategies for curricular development. National and state standards are emphasized. Using the Expanded ADEPT Evaluation System candidates will construct a long-range plan and unit work sample. A 20-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • EDUC 429 - Secondary Social Studies Curriculum and Methods


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and EDUC 325 and SPED 361 with a grade of “C” or better. Corequisites: EDUC 417. Should be taken the semester prior to clinical practice.  Study of secondary social studies curriculum and methods. Emphasis on instructional strategies in the secondary social studies classroom. Examination of the South Carolina framework and curriculum standards for social studies as well as research findings regarding effective teaching strategies in the secondary social studies classroom. National and state standards are emphasized. Using the Expanded ADEPT Evaluation System candidates will construct long range plan and unit work sample.   A 20-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall.
  
  • EDUC 436 - Clinical Practice in the Elementary School


    (12 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Practice. An intensive field-based co-teaching experience that includes observation, participation and supervised teaching in an elementary school classroom (grades 2-6) for sixty (60) full days. The clinical practitioner works with an ADEPT certified teacher and university supervisor to develop and implement an integrated curriculum that is designed to meet the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive needs of students in the classroom. The clinical practitioner becomes a member of a teaching team that includes, classroom teachers, special area teachers, staff, administrators, parents/guardians, community agencies, professional consultants, school volunteers, and students from diverse cultural background. Demonstrated competency as identified by the ADEPT performance evaluation instrument is required. Professional seminars are required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: An incomplete cannot be received. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • EDUC 438 - Clinical Practice in Early Childhood Education


    (12 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Practice. An intensive field-based co-teaching experience that includes observation, participation and supervised teaching in an early childhood classroom (grades P-3) for sixty (60) full days. The clinical practitioner works with an ADEPT certified teacher and university supervisor to develop and implement an integrated curriculum that is designed to meet the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive needs of students in the classroom. The clinical practitioner becomes a member of a teaching team that includes, classroom teachers, special area teachers, staff, administrators, parents/guardians, community agencies, professional consultants, school volunteers, and students from diverse cultural background. Demonstrated competency as identified by the ADEPT performance evaluation instrument is required. Professional seminars are required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: An incomplete cannot be received. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • EDUC 440 - Clinical Practice in the Secondary School


    (12 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Practice. An intensive field-based experience that includes observation, participation, and supervised teaching in a secondary classroom (grades 9-12) for sixty (60) full days. The clinical practitioner works with an Expanded ADEPT certified teacher and university supervisor to develop and implement an integrated curriculum that is designed to meet the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive needs of students in the classroom. The clinical practioner becomes a member of a teaching team that includes classroom teachers, special area teachers, staff, administrators, parents/guardians, community agencies, professional consultants, school volunteers, and students from diverse cultural backgrounds. Demonstrated proficiency in the four domains of the South Carolina Teacher Standards identified by the state-mandated Expanded ADEPT performance evaluation instrument is required. Professional seminars are required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: An incomplete cannot be received. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • EDUC 441 - Clinical Practice in the Middle Grades


    (12 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to Clinical Practice. An intensive field-based experience that includes observation, participation and supervised teaching in a middle grades classroom (grades 5-8) for sixty (60) full days (two placements of six weeks each). The clinical practitioner works with an Expanded ADEPT certified teacher and university supervisor to develop and implement an integrated curriculum that is designed to meet the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive needs of students in the classroom. The clinical practitioner becomes a member of a teaching team that includes classroom teachers, special area teachers, staff, administrators, parents/guardians, community agencies, professional consultants, school volunteers, and students from diverse cultural backgrounds. Demonstrated proficiency in the four domains of the South Carolina Teacher Standards identified by the state-mandated Expanded ADEPT performance evaluation instrument is required. Professional seminars are required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: An incomplete cannot be received. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • EDUC 442 - Clinical Practice in the Elementary and Secondary Schools


    (12 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Practice. An intensive field-based experience in grades K-12 for music and physical education majors that includes observation, participation, and supervised teaching in elementary and secondary environments for sixty (60) full days.  The clinical practitioner works with an Expanded  ADEPT certified teacher and university supervisor to develop and implement an integrated curriculum that is designed to meet the social, emotional, physical, and cognitive needs of students in the classroom. The clinical practitioner becomes a member of a teaching team that includes classroom teachers, special area teachers, staff, administrators, parents/guardians, community agencies, professional consultants, school volunteers, and students from diverse cultural backgrounds. Demonstrated proficiency in the four domains of the South Carolina Teacher Standards identified by the state-mandated Expanded ADEPT performance evaluation instrument is required. Professional seminars are required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites.   This course cannot be challenged. Note: An incomplete cannot be received. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • EDUC 443 - Special Topics in Teacher Education Inquiry and Application


    (1 - 3 hours) Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Education. An inquiry and/or extended study and application of an approved teacher education topic and/or project. Course goals and objectives may be selected to satisfy any teacher education program of study. The study may take place off campus. Students are responsible for arranging for their own transportation. The course may also be used as an elective or content emphasis. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • SPED 361 - Instructional Strategies for Diverse Learners


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: EDUC 201 (grade of “C” or better), GPA of at least 2.0, Declaration of Intent to Seek Certification or approval from School of EDUC. A focus on the identification of various kinds of exceptionalities and techniques for individualizing instruction and managing students of various skills, abilities, socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. Identification procedures, assessment measures, general program approaches, curriculum development theories, self-esteem strategies, and intervention techniques will be emphasized. Also included will be specific strategies for dealing with “at-risk” students. A 12-hour practicum is required. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to designated or assigned sites. This course cannot be challenged. Note: Offered: Fall and Spring.

Engineering

  
  • ENGR 100 - Engineering Skills and Applications


    (2 hours) Corequisites:MATH 110 or equivalent. This course provides a reinforcement of the fundamental mathematical skills required in engineering.  Real-world problems will be studied and analyzed through the use of in-class activities and hands-on experiments. This 2 credit course is intended for engineering students who are not-yet ready for calculus.  Other STEM related majors are welcome to take this course.  This course is not required for the Applied Mathematics degree. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • ENGR 101 - Introduction to Engineering


    (3 hours) Co-requisite: MATH 221. An overview of the engineering profession, disciplines, curricula, professional ethics, environmental and societal issues, design process, and current trends. Technical communication skills and problem-solving techniques are emphasized. Material is introduced through the use of readings, discussion, hands-on learning activities, projects, and field trips.
  
  • ENGR 201 - Statics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGR 101, MATH 321 and PHYS 203. A study of forces and force systems and their external effect on bodies, principally the condition of equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Includes a study of distributed forces, centroids and center of gravity, moments of inertia, analysis of simple structures and machines, and various types of friction. The techniques of vector mathematics are employed and the rigor of physical analysis is emphasized.
  
  • ENGR 202 - Dynamics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGR 201 and MATH 321. A continuation of ENGR 201. A study of kinematics of particles and rigid bodies, kinetics of particles with emphasis on Newton’s second law, energy and momentum methods for the solution of problems, and applications of plane motion of rigid bodies. Techniques of vector mathematics are employed.
  
  • ENGR 210 - Circuits


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGR 101, MATH 222 and PHYS 204. A study of D.C. resistive circuits; Kirchoff’s Laws; independent and dependent sources; nodal and mesh analysis; superposition; Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems; maximum power transfer; natural response of RC, RL, and RLC circuits; forced response of RC, RL, and RLC circuits; operational amplifiers; sinusoidal analysis and phasors.
  
  • ENGR 211 - Circuits Lab


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 222, PHYS 204, and (corequisite)ENGR 210. This course offers a hands-on study of the basic analog measurement devices, instrumentation, components, and circuits used in electrical engineering.  Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement the material presented in the first electrical circuits course.
  
  • ENGR 212 - Circuit Analysis II


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGR 210, ENGR 211, and MATH 321. A continuation of ENGR 210.  A study of the frequency response of circuits.  Includes AC power, three-phase circuits, frequency response, and active filters.  The use of computer applications is employed to assist in the analysis and design of engineering problems. This course cannot be challenged.

English

  
  • ENGL 099 - Fundamentals of Writing and Mechanics


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: Admission to CSU through the Bridge Program or appropriate score on the English Placement Exam. For students who are deemed at risk in these areas of English, the course concentrates on development of practical writing skills, focusing on the writing process in development of essays, understanding of rhetorical strategies, and conventions of grammar and usage. This course emphasizes college level composition and is intended to facilitate transition into English 111. Minimum grade of “C” or better before matriculating from the Bridge program and/or to any other English course. This course may not be attempted more than twice. Students receive institutional credit only. This course may not be challenged. Note: 099 courses will be calculated in student GPAs but will not be included in the earned hours toward graduation (CSU students typically need 125 hours for graduation).
  
  • ENGL 100 - English


    (3 hours) Designation reserved for elective credit received under the CLEP program.
  
  • ENGL 111 - English Composition and Rhetoric I


    (3 hours) A composition course designed to improve students’ informative, analytic and persuasive writing. Includes documentation and research. English Exit Examination given as final exam. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 112 - English Composition and Rhetoric II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: ENGL 111. A continuation of English 111, with emphasis on introduction to literary study and writing about literature. Includes documentation and research. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 121 - Composition and Rhetoric I for Multilingual Writers


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Regular admit in English. A course designed for non-native speakers of English to improve in writing ability, emphasizing theme writing based on the study of essays.  Offered in lieu of ENGL 111 for ESL students. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 122 - Composition and Literature for Multilingual Writers


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 121. A continuation of ENGL 121 with emphasis on writing based on the study of literature, including research writing.  This course is designed for students who speak and write multiple languages and who consider English a secondary language.  Offered in lieu of ENGL 112 for ESL students. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 202 - Survey of American Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. A study of the principal authors from the Colonial Period to the present, including literature by women and minorities, with emphasis on advanced literary concepts, structures, and terminology. Students are also introduced to major contemporary literary theories.
  
  • ENGL 203 - Survey of English Literature I


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. A study of the principal authors from the Old English period to the eighteenth century with emphasis on advanced literary concepts, structures, and terminology. Students are also introduced to major contemporary literary theories.
  
  • ENGL 204 - Survey of English Literature II


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. A study of the principal authors from the end of the eighteenth century to the contemporary period with emphasis on advanced literary concepts, structures, and terminology. Students are also introduced to major contemporary literary theories.
  
  • ENGL 250 - Workplace and Technical Writing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. This course is designed to introduce you to many of the basic writing tasks you will encounter in your professional career, including the composition of letters, memos, resumes, proposals, instructions, reports and web-based writings for specific audiences. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 251 - Introduction to Creative Writing - Fiction and Narrative


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. An introduction to the basic principles of writing fiction and creative narratives. This course will emphasize the study of narrative forms and will require students write creative narratives and submit them to workshops. Students are expected to respond to peer works. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 252 - Introduction to Creative Writing - Poetry


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. An introduction to the basic principles of writing poetry. This course will emphasize the study of prosody and poetic forms and will require students write creative poems and submit them to workshops. Students are expected to respond to peer works. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 311 - Major American Writers to 1865


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 202. A study of American literature from the Colonial Period to 1865, focusing on such major authors as Franklin, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Douglass, Melville, Whitman and Dickinson. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 312 - Major American Writers from 1865 to 1945


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112 and 202. A study of American literature from 1865 to the end of World War II, focusing on such major authors as Twain, James, Crane, Frost, Eliot, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner and Hughes. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 313 - Major American Writers Since 1945


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 202. A study of American literature from the end of World War II to the present, focusing on such major authors as Lowell, Baldwin, Williams, Miller, O’Connor, Welty, Ellison and Plath. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 314 - Diversity in American Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112 and 202. A study of the culturally diverse literary heritage of the United States from the colonial period to the present, especially focusing on African American, Native American, Hispanic, Asian American, and other authors from ethnic and immigrant backgrounds often overlooked in the traditional American canon. Authors studied may include Wheatley, Douglass, Hurston, Ellison, Morrison, Tan, Cisneros, and Momaday. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 317 - The Text: Forms, Methods and Concepts


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 202, 203 or 204 (Grade of “C” or better).

    This course will explore the various formats of text.  Specifically, informational text, imaginative text, and digital text.  The course will not only examine text exemplars, but also how adolescents read, write and interact with texts.  Counts toward English Education, Writing Emphasis elective and English minor.

  
  • ENGL 318 - Adolescent Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204. A survey of literature appropriate to the needs, interests, and abilities of the middle and secondary school students. This course may not be challenged. Note: Adolescent Literature counts toward the major only for students in English Education.
  
  • ENGL 319 - Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 252 or instructor permission. Creative writing workshop focused on the crafting of poetry. Students will write and submit poems to workshops and respond to peer works. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 320 - Advanced Creative Writing: Narrative


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 251 or instructor permission. Creative writing workshop focused on narrative prose. Students will submit creative narratives to workshops and respond to peer works. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 333 - Advanced Composition and Rhetoric


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204. A thorough study of grammar and the development of effective styles of writing through analysis and imitation of masters of English prose. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 351 - The Romantic Movement


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 204. A study of the new creative spirit manifested in the poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, as well as minor poets of the age. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 352 - The Victorian Period


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 204. A study of English literature from 1832 to 1900 with emphasis on such major poets as Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Hardy and on such major prose writers as Carlyle, Mill, Ruskin, Huxley, Eliot, and Wilde. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 353 - British Literature Since 1900


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112 and 204. A study of British and commonwealth literature since 1900 with emphasis on such major writers as Shaw, Conrad, Yeats, Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, T.S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley, Beckett, Auden, Orwell, Coetzee, Gordimer, and Munro. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 354 - Literary Criticism


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204. A course in applied criticism of literary works – poetry, fiction, and drama, using the most commonly applied traditional and modern methods. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 357 - Shakespeare


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and ENGL 203. A study of Shakespeare’s major plays, including comedies, histories, and tragedies. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 358 - Renaissance Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 203. A study of English literature from 1500 to 1660 with emphasis on such writers as Spenser, Shakespeare (nondramatic poetry only), Marlowe, Donne, Jonson, Bunyan, and Milton. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 361 - The English Novel to 1900


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 203 or 204. A study of representative novels by major British authors, such as Fielding, Austen, Scott, the Brontës, Dickens, George Eliot, and Hardy. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 362 - The Modern Novel


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202 or 204. A study of major novelists since 1900, including such writers as Conrad, Joyce, Wolfe, Hemingway, Faulkner, Camus, Garcia- Marquez and other major novelists. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 371 - Modern Drama


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202 or 204. A study of American, British, and Continental drama including such playwrights as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Synge, O’Neill, Pirandello, Brecht, Ionesco, and Beckett. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 400 - English Seminar


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, 202, 203, and 204. Open to senior level English majors only (students with less than 91 hours will be admitted only by permission of the English chair). This is a capstone seminar required of all English majors. Students will be required to sit for the Major Fields Test in English (or other assessment exams), revise at least four papers originally submitted for upper division English for a portfolio, and discuss, research, and write about one major literary work. Furthermore, students will discuss graduate schools, professional opportunities, careers in education, and other post graduation possibilities. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 401 - General Linguistics


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112 and either ENGL 202, 203, or 204. An introductory course in descriptive and comparative linguistics, conducted in English. Strongly recommended for students who plan to attend graduate school and/or to teach English, a foreign language, or speech/communication in high school. Cross-listed under Communication and Theatre. (Parent = COMM) This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 402 - Early English Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 203. An introduction to the significant works, authors, and genres of Old and Middle English literature. Students read Old and Middle English texts when possible or modern translations to gain familiarity with the language, art, and style of the works. Background material provided on the life and times of the authors, for each period in particular and the Middle Ages in England and the Continent in general. Attention is also paid to the influence of author, work, style, or genre on English literature of later periods. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 405 - Women and Literature


    (3 hours) ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204. A study of the significant contributions of women to literature written in English, and a study of women’s themes and issues as presented in literature, criticism, and literary theory. Included will be such writers as Anne Bradstreet, Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Emily Dickinson, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, and Toni Morrison. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 409 - Topics in Christianity and Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, ENGL 112, and either ENGL 202, ENGL 203, or ENGL 204. An exploration of issues at the intersection of Christianity and literature.  Versions of the course may focus on a particular genre (e.g. Spiritual Autobiography; Christianity and the Epic), theme (e.g. Faith and Doubt in Literature), theory (e.g. Christianity and Postmodern Literary Theory), or author(s) (e.g. Flannery O’Connor; C.S. Lewis and the Inklings).
  
  • ENGL 410 - Theories and Applications of Grammar and Composition


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204. A practical introduction to the theories of teaching grammar and composition and their applications in the classroom, with special emphasis on the structure and terminology of traditional grammar. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 411 - Southern Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 202. An investigation of the literary achievement in the South from the Colonial period to the present with emphasis upon Jefferson, Simms, King, Chopin, Faulkner, Welty, Warren, O’Connor, Berry, and others. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 413 - History of the English Language


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204. A survey of the English language from Indo-European backgrounds through Old and Middle to Modern English. Major changes in phonology and syntax examined in a historical/cultural context, with Modern English including dialects and new grammars. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 425 - English Capstone


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, 202, 203, and 204. Open to senior level English majors only (students with fewer than 91 hours will be admitted only by permission of the English chair). This is a capstone seminar required of all English and English: Writing Emphasis majors.  Through readings, writings, and experiential learning, students will explore vocational possibilities for English majors, both specific post-graduation careers and general callings as lifelong readers and writers (especially considering the latter from a Christian perspective). Students will demonstrate professional preparation through the Major Fields Test in English (or other assessment exams), submission of a writing portfolio, and completion of a project bearing one hour of experiential learning credit. This course replaces ENGL 400 for English and English: Writing Emphasis majors. This course cannot be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 448 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and 203. A study of major English writers from 1660 to 1800, including such authors as Dryden, Congreve, Swift, Pope, Fielding, Johnson, Boswell, and Sheridan. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 452 - The Modern Short Story


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either 202 or 204. A study of modern short stories by such writers as Conrad, Chekhov, Mann, Joyce, Lawrence, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Borges. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 455 - Modern Poetry


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202 or 204. A study of British, American, and World poetry from the early twentieth century to the present day. Readings include the works of such poets as Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Hughes, Neruda, Rilke, Szymborska, Heaney, and Walcott. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 456 - Greek and Roman Literature in Translation


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202 or 204. A survey in translation of Greek and Roman literary masterpieces including works of such authors as Homer, the great tragic and comic writers, Plato, Aristotle, Virgil, and Cicero. This course may not be challenged.
  
  • ENGL 469 - Internship in English


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204; minimum GPA of 2.75; junior standing. Course may be taken twice for credit; all hours count as general electives only unless credit toward the major is approved by the chair. Internship requires 112 hours of supervised work in a professional setting that allows the student to apply reading, writing, editing, and critical skills. Students should consult advisors concerning available sites. This course may not be challenged. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.
  
  • ENGL 470 - Internship in English


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, and either ENGL 202, 203 or 204; minimum GPA of 2.75; junior standing. Course may be taken twice for credit; all hours count as general electives only unless credit toward the major is approved by the chair. Internship requires 112 hours of supervised work in a professional setting that allows the student to apply reading, writing, editing, and critical skills. Students should consult advisors concerning available sites. This course may not be challenged. Note: Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Counts for ELR credit.

French

  
  • FREN 101 - Elementary French I


    (3 hours) A course designed to provide a foundation for understanding speaking, reading, and writing French. Weekly laboratory requirement.
  
  • FREN 102 - Elementary French II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Further development of essential speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Weekly laboratory requirement.
  
  • FREN 201 - Intermediate French I


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 102 or equivalent. A course designed to strengthen and expand the foundation provided by French 101-102. Weekly laboratory requirement.
  
  • FREN 202 - Intermediate French II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 201 or equivalent. A course designed to strengthen and expand the foundation provided by French 101, 102, and 201. Weekly laboratory requirement.
  
  • FREN 213 - French Literature in Translation


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and 112. The course is designed to familiarize students with prominent French writers from the Middle Ages to the present time. Various aspects of French society are discussed in conjunction with the readings. Among the authors to be read are Racine Corneille, Moliere, Voltaire, Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, and Camus. Conducted in English.
  
  • FREN 311 - French Literature: Pre-18th Century


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. A general survey of French literature from its beginning to the eighteenth century; extensive readings, reports, and discussions in French.
  
  • FREN 312 - French Literature: Post-18th Century


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. A general survey of French literature from the eighteenth century to the present; extensive readings, reports, and discussions in French.
  
  • FREN 321 - Development of the French Novel


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. The development of the French novel from the Seventeenth Century to the early Twentieth Century. Lectures parallel readings and reports.
  
  • FREN 331 - Advanced Oral French


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. A course designed to raise the French knowledge level of students to that expected of persons to be employed for the first time as high school teachers of French. Extensive knowledge of French grammar and fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing conversational French are objectives. Oral skills are emphasized.
  
  • FREN 332 - Advanced Written French


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. A course designed to raise the French knowledge level of students to that expected of persons to be employed for the first time as high school teachers of French. Extensive knowledge of French grammar and fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing conversational French are objectives. Writing skills are emphasized.
  
  • FREN 421 - Seventeenth-Century French Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: One 300-level French course. The Golden Age of French literature including the plays of Corneille, Racine, and Molière.
  
  • FREN 423 - Nineteenth-Century French Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: One 300-level French course. A study of literary movements. Lecture, parallel readings, and reports.
  
  • FREN 424 - Contemporary French Literature


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: One 300-level French course. A study of the principal writers from 1900 to present.
 

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