Dec 04, 2022  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Nursing

  
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    NURS 416 - Spirituality, Health and Healing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Completion of all 300 level NURS courses (grade of “C” or better) and SOCI 312 (grade of “C” or better), admission to the nursing program or permission of the instructor. The course allows the student to explore the theme of healing with focus on the mind-body connection, as it intersects with faith, spirituality and faith communities. The opportunity for development and support of faith-based initiatives within community health promotion programs will be examined. Cross-listed with Health Promotion. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    NURS 420 - Senior Project


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Completion of all 300 level Nursing courses for basic students. The course provides the opportunity for students to creatively and independently explore an area of professional nursing while drawing upon theories and concepts from liberal education and nursing. Learning objectives and methods of evaluation are designed to meet individual student learning needs. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    NURS 422 - Professional Role Transition in Nursing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Admission to the RN-BSN Option and completion of at least 52 credit hours of the 64 credit non-nursing courses. This course focuses on the development of the professional self concept in response to change through examination and reflection of personal and professional values. Concepts related to professional role responsibilities, nursing history, nursing theory, evidence-based nursing practice, ethics and career development will be explored.
  
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    NURS 430 - Capstone: Preparing for the Professional Role


    (2 [2-0-0] hours) Completion of all 300 level Nursing courses; Prerequisites or Corequisites: All 400 level Nursing courses. Taken in final semester of the nursing major/program. The capstone experience allows for synthesis of theories and knowledge from the arts, sciences, and nursing in order to refine critical thinking skills for making clinical and professional judgments from a multidimensional perspective in preparation for NCLEX-RN success and the professional role. This course cannot be challenged.

Physics

  
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    PHYS 100 - Physical Science


    (3 hours) Designation reserved for elective credit received under the CLEP program.
  
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    PHYS 111 - Physical Science for Educators


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: Math 110 or 111 (grade of “C” or better) and permission of the Education department. This course is designed for early childhood and elementary education majors following the state of South Carolina’s science standards for grades kindergarten through 8th grade. Included is an introduction to the concepts of properties and measurement, motion, sound, electricity, energy, light, atomic structure, nuclear change, and chemical change. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required.) Cross-listed under Chemistry. (Parent = CHEM)
  
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    PHYS 115 - Astronomy


    (4 hours) A descriptive survey of the universe, with emphasis on basic physical concepts and the objects in our solar system along with galactic and extragalactic objects, is presented. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required). This course cannot be challenged. Note: All students placed in MATH 099 must complete the course successfully before being allowed Into PHYS 115.
  
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    PHYS 120 - Weather and Climate


    (4 hours) A largely nonmathematical course in the study of the Earth’s atmosphere. This course examines the structure, composition, and properties of the atmosphere: origin and changes in the atmosphere over geologic history, comparison of Earth’s atmosphere to that of other planets, weather lore, cloud formation and identification, hurricanes, midlatitude cyclones, tornadoes, dust devils, Coriolis force, pressure gradient force, geostrophic winds, global atmospheric circulation, climate change, the greenhouse effect, inversions, deterioration of the ozone layer, weather maps and Instruments, weather forecasting, lightning and other aspects of atmospheric electricity, optical properties of the atmosphere (rainbows, haloes, perihelia and parselene, coronae, and glories; mirages), interaction of the atmosphere with the oceans, fronts and air masses are among the topics examined. (Laboratory fee required)
  
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    PHYS 201 - Introductory Physics I


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 130 (grade of “C” ). A highly mathematical problem solving algebra/trigonometry based physics course. Topics include review of vector analysis. Newtonian mechanics, fluids and, thermodynamics. Laboratories are designed to enhance lecture topics with attention to safe use of equipment, statistical analysis of data, and the acquisition of skills required in scientific processes. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PHYS 202 - Introductory Physics II


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: PHYS 201 (grade of “C” or better). A continuation of Physics 201. Topics include waves, sound, electricity, magnetism, and optics. Laboratories are designed to enhance lecture topics with attention to safe use of equipment, statistical analysis of data, and the acquisition skills required in scientific processes. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PHYS 203 - General Physics I


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: MATH 221 (grade of “C” or better). The application of calculus to the study of Newtonian mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics. Laboratories are designed to enhance lecture topics with attention to safe use of equipment, statistical analysis of data, and the acquisition of skills required in scientific processes. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PHYS 204 - General Physics II


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: PHYS 203 (grade of “C” or better ). A continuation of Physics 203. The application of calculus to the study of waves, sound, electricity, magnetism, and optics. Laboratories are designed to enhance lecture topics with attention to safe use of equipment, statistical analysis of data, and the acquisition skills required in scientific processes. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PHYS 205 - Elementary Modern Physics


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: PHYS 204 or permission of the instructor. An introduction to special relativity, quantum theory and quantum mechanics, nuclear structure, and statistical distributions.
  
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    PHYS 333 - Cosmology, Creation and Christianity


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: 12 hours of science credit, including PHYS 201 or 203. In this course students will engage in learning, research and discussion of scientific topics including the creation of the universe, the creation of the earth, requirements for life and the nature of time, and consider how they support and complement a biblical worldview. Students will also consider the scientific problems posed to alternative worldviews. The course will address several current issues, including the role of Christianity in science, the philosophical foundations of naturalism, and the role of Intelligent Design in the science classroom.
  
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    PHYS 360 - Physics of Robotics


    (4 hours) Prerequisite: Physics 204 (grade of “C” or better).  The application of physics to the analysis, design, and implementation of robotic systems.  Topics include sensors, actuators, mechanics, electronics, power, and computer integration.  Course project consists of the design and implementation of a fully functional robotic application. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. (Laboratory fee required).   This course cannot be challenged.

Political Science

  
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    POLI 101 - Introduction to Political Science


    (3 hours) An introduction to the study of politics consisting primarily of a survey of dominant political themes including political science methodology, political power, forms of government, political ideologies, public opinion, interest groups, political parties, government structures and functions, public policy, violence and revolution, and international relations.
  
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    POLI 201 - American National Government


    (3 hours) An introductory study of the nature and functions of American national government, including the origin and development of the Constitution, democracy, federalism, civil liberties, civil rights, citizenship, political parties, pressure groups, and elections in the United States.
  
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    POLI 202 - State and Local Government


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201. An analysis of the operations and functions of state governments and their local units, particularly the government of South Carolina and its entities.
  
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    POLI 221 - Introduction to Public Administration


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201 or 311. An introductory study of public administration in governmental organizations, emphasizing the principles of management and fiscal, personnel, planning, and public practices.
  
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    POLI 311 - Comparative Politics


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 101. The origin, development, and present operation of major European governments and a study of the major governments and problems of the developing world.
  
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    POLI 312 - International Relations


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 101. An analysis of the study and conduct of international relations and an examination of the actors and other factors influencing international relations such as perceptions, components of power, economic activity, the use of force, and collective security.
  
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    POLI 313 - Parties and Interest Groups


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: POLI 201 or 311. An analysis of the role played by political parties and interest groups in the American political process at both the national and local levels.
  
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    POLI 314 - Political Parties and Public Opinion


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201 or 311. An analysis of American political parties, nominations, elections and the impact of public opinion on campaigns. This course is offered in fall semesters in even-numbered years. Special emphasis will be on presidential campaigns during presidential election years and on congressional campaigns during other years.
  
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    POLI 315 - International Conflict


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 312. An analysis at the system, state/dyadic, and individual levels of analysis of the variables or conditions that cause state to engage in militarized disputes.
  
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    POLI 316 - Campaigns and Elections


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: POLI 201 or 311. An analysis of political campaigning, nominations, elections, and public opinion. Students will study the impact of elections on our Institutions of government, and learn how to run an effective political campaign. This course is offered in Fall semesters in even-numbered years to correspond with national elections. Special emphasis will be on presidential campaigns during presidential election years and on congressional campaigns during other years.
  
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    POLI 320 - Politics and Government in Africa


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: POLI 311 or 312. An introduction to the domestic politics of sub-Saharan Africa, explaining the recent rise of both multiparty democracy and state collapse across the continent. The course also examines the colonial legacy, the nature of the African state, ethnic conflict, class divisions, the role of the military and the problems of economic underdevelopment.
  
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    POLI 361 - Criminal Law


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: CRIM 210 or POLI 201. A study of substantive crimes and their punishment, special defenses, inchoate and group criminality, and limitations of the criminal law. Appropriate attention is given to distinguishing aspects of South Carolina criminal law. Cross-listed under Criminal Justice. (Criminal Justice = Parent)
  
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    POLI 362 - Criminal Procedure


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: CRIM 210. An examination of procedural steps from investigation through arrest, conviction, and appeal, with special emphasis on the constitutional guarantees protecting citizens and the accused and how those constitutional guarantees affect law enforcement practices and the judicial process. May be used for major/minor credit for Criminal Justice. Cross-listed under Criminal Justice. (Criminal Justice = Parent)
  
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    POLI 412 - International Political Economy


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 312. This class is an analysis of the economic relations between states as well as the effect of non-state actors on the International political economy.
  
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    POLI 413 - Western Political Thought


    (3 hours) Analysis of the major figures and concepts of Western political theory from the Greeks to the present time.
  
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    POLI 415 - Contemporary Political Thought


    (3 hours) A study of conflicting political theories of the 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on current conflicts between democratic and competing communistic ideologies.
  
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    POLI 417 - The U.S. Congress


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: POLI 201 or 311. An in-depth study of the legislative process, examining the importance of elections political parties, committee systems, rules and personalities. The course focuses on the US congress, but the material and methods can be applied to understanding legislatures in other nations or within the American states.
  
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    POLI 418 - United States National Security & Foreign Policy


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 312. An examination of the process of making national security and foreign policy in the United States. The roles of the President, Congress, the State and Defense Departments, National Security Council intelligence agencies, special interests groups, the media and public opinion are explored.
  
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    POLI 419 - The American Presidency


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201 or 311. An examination of the origins and growth of the American Presidency. The constitutional role and historical development of the American Presidency will be considered in relationship to the meaning of democratic government, separation of powers, and the expansion of the federal government’s power during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
  
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    POLI 420 - History of American Diplomacy I


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 212. History 420 surveys the development of United States diplomatic history, utilizing secondary readings, primary sources, fiction, and film.  Events such as the American Revolution, the War of 1812, continental expansion, the Mexican War, the Civil War, overseas expansion, and World Wars I & II will be examined within the context of domestic and international politics, ideology, and culture. Additionally, this course is intended to sharpen students analytical and critical thinking skills as well as cultivate an appreciation for the contemporary relevance of the historical material. Cross-listed under History. (History = Parent)
     
  
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    POLI 421 - Constitutional Law I


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201 or CRIM 210 and 9 semester hours of additional POLI or CRIM courses. Examination of the establishment of the Supreme Court’s power of judicial review, the scope and limits of the powers of the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the national government, and the relationship of the national government to the states. Cross-listed under Criminal Justice. (Political Science = Parent)
  
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    POLI 422 - Constitutional Law II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 201 or CRIM 210 and 9 semester hours of additional POLI or CRIM courses. Analysis of the judicial interpretation of the Bill of Rights emphasizing the First Amendment: the establishment and free exercise of religion, the freedom of speech, press, and assembly; and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment: equal protection of racial, sexual, political and economic groups. Cross-listed under Criminal Justice. (Political Science = Parent)
  
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    POLI 423 - International Law


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 312. A study of the basic character, general principles and specific rules of international law, with emphasis on contemporary trends in the field and its relation to other aspects of International affairs.
  
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    POLI 424 - International Organizations


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: POLI 312. An introduction to the structure and functions of International political and economic organizations. Particular attention is given to the United Nations and its specialized agencies, and to emerging regional communities.
  
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    POLI 428 - Christian Political Thought


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: HIST 111, RELI 111 or 112. An examination of Christian political thought from the early Church to the present. Students will read perspectives on politics by Christians across Church history and around the world, with a focus on evangelical political thought and the Intersection between the Church’s evangelistic calling and the political realm. Course assignments will include a research paper and weekly reflection papers.
  
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    POLI 430 - History of American Diplomacy II


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: HIST 212 History 430 surveys the development of American diplomacy since World War II, utilizing secondary readings, primary sources, fiction, and film.  Events such as the origins of the Cold War, the development of the national security state, the Korean War, the arms race, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War, detente, the end of the Cold War, and post-Cold War challenges will be examined within the context of domestic and international politics, ideology, and culture.  Additionally, this course is intended to sharpen students’ analytical and critical thinking skills as well as cultivate an appreciation for the contemporary relevance of the historical material presented. Cross-listed with History (Parent= History).

     

  
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    POLI 450 - Qualitative Research Methods in Political Science


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: A declared major of Political Science and POLI 101 AND 201; MATH 110 OR 111; one of: PSYC 301, ECON 224, MATH 213 or an equivalent statistics course approved by the department. This course provides political science majors with the theoretical and practical foundations for further in-depth study in the field.  It combines an introduction to the techniques used to conduct and evaluate political science research with a discipline-specific application of statistical methods.  This course is a graduation requirement for all political science majors.
  
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    POLI 455 - Senior Thesis


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: POLI 450 and senior standing. This course is a required capstone research experience for all political science majors.  it is intended to reinforce research and writing skills, to promote critical thinking, and to engender creative analysis of political science issues.  In consultation with a full-time political science instructor of their choosing and using a research design prepared in POLI 450, students will complete an extensive individual research project and present it to their peers.
  
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    POLI 470 - Internship in Political Science


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 and a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the Political Science major or minor. Applicants must have at least junior standing at CSU. All internships must be approved by the department chairperson. This course requires 112 hours of supervised work experience. Arrangements for assignments, work hours and working conditions must meet with the mutual satisfaction of the student, the supervising professor, the department chairperson and the agency.
  
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    POLI 498 - Honors Project in Political Science


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Completion of at least 90 semester hours of acceptable credit, at least a 3.5 GPA in Political Science major or minor, at least a 3.0 GPA overall, and permission of the department chairperson. This course presents an opportunity for a superior political science student to pursue advanced study. A faculty supervisor will be appointed to work with the student in developing and pursuing a scholarly, individual study of a selected political science topic.
  
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    POLI 499 - Political Science Senior Seminar


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: Declared major in political science, POLI 450 and senior status in the program. This course is a capstone seminar required of all Political Science majors.  Through interaction with professionals from the local area, this course will allow students to explore opportunities in government service, the legal profession, graduate study, and other careers in the field.  Class discussions will also consider the interaction of a Christian worldview with matters of public policy, international relations and the academic discipline of political science.  Students are required to complete the ETS Major Field Test (MFT) in Political Science or similar standardized assessment test.

Project Management

  
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    PMGT 320 - Projects as Strategic Initiatives


    (3 hours) Develop learning strategies that examine ethical and practical applied management decisions related to project management and strategic initiates presented in organizations.  This would include the basic and initial phases of initiation, planning, control, execution, evaluation and assessment of the strategic project.   Concentrates on the management procedures used to make appropriate managerial decisions.
  
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    PMGT 321 - Decision Making and Project Initiation


    (3 hours) Review, analyze and demonstrate various decision making perceptions, judgments, and choices used to make appropriate project initiation decisions at the departmental and organizational levels.  Examines and demonstrates the initiation processes used to implement a project to ensure that stakeholder interests are maintained to include applied decision outcomes and validation.
  
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    PMGT 322 - Project Planning & Implementation


    (3 hours) Outlines and demonstrates how project planning and implementation procedures are established to include; information gathering, integration of data, documentation of processes and the tools used to plan and implement a project.  The scope, depth, risk, work plans and needs and contingency plans will be reviewed as part of this course.
  
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    PMGT 323 - Managing Project Quality and Change


    (3 hours) Review, assess and establish applied practices related to project quality assessments to include change agents, quality audits, quality control and assurance.  Examines techniques and assessment tools used to determine and implement change based on stakeholder needs.  Develop a process or model for communicating change within the organization and determining how change may impact the project outcomes.
  
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    PMGT 324 - Project Estimation and Cost Management


    (3 hours) Outlines and analyzes the financial and economic impact on projects to include product and system development.  This course is intended to support the applied management process by summarizing the accounting, budgeting, cost estimate, financial management and project design to ensure the best potential business outcomes.
  
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    PMGT 325 - Project Risk Assessment


    (3 hours) Examines the risk factors presented in any phase of a project.  Utilize risk-assessment tools to determine the highest risk level for each of the phases of a project.  Understand the importance of a risk assessment process and the application of tools and decision making procedures to ensure positive business outcomes.

Psychology

  
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    PSYC 110 - General Psychology


    (3 hours) An introduction to the concepts, principles, and problems basic to the understanding of behavior. Majors must receive a grade of “C” or better for graduation.
  
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    PSYC 115 - Critical Thinking and Writing in Psychology


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and ENGL 112. Teaches students the fundamentals of scientific writing including literature reviews, and research reports.  Emphasis will be placed on learning APA style and thinking critically about literature in psychology.   This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 210 - A Psychological Disorder In-depth


    (1 hours) Prerequisites will vary, check MyCSU for prerequisites. An introduction to the concepts, principles, and problems basic to the understanding of a specific psychological disorder. This course is for informational purposes and is not designed to address individual needs for counseling.
  
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    PSYC 221 - Child Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: PSYC 110. A study of the development of the human being from conception to adolescence. Major topics include prenatal development and infancy, language and cognitive development, and social influences on development.
  
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    PSYC 222 - Adolescent Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: PSYC 110. A study of the development of the human being from puberty until young adulthood.
  
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    PSYC 230 - Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: PSYC 110. A study of ethical issues related to helping professionals such as counseling, marriage and family therapy, social work and music therapy. Topics will include confidentiality, informed consent, ethical issues in couples and family therapy, group work and within the community. Additionally, personal values and a Christian worldview will be examined as they relate to ethical standards, professional behavior and ethical decision-making.
  
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    PSYC 250 - Social Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or PSYC 110. A study of the effects of the social experience on the behavior of individuals. Topics may include: attitudes, persuasion, conformity, aggression, prosocial behavior, attraction and prejudice. Cross-listed under Sociology. (Psychology = Parent)
  
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    PSYC 260 - Positive Psychology


    (1 hours) Prerequisite: PSYC 110  

    Positive psychology is the scientific study of positive experiences, positive individual traits, and the institutions and practices that facilitate their development.  This course reviews the paradigm shift from pathology to strengths-based psychology as well as the literature that leads to a psychology of happiness and adjustment with subtopics including life meaning, religion/spirituality, and positive psychology interventions.

  
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    PSYC 275 - Introduction to Psychopathology (Abnormal)


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: PSYC 110. A study of the etiology, symptomatology, and treatment of the major behavior disorders diagnosed in adulthood. Other topics include diagnostic classification and a historical and theoretical framework of adult psychopathology. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 301 - Introduction to Behavioral Statistics


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 105 or higher (grade of “C” or better), and PSYC 110 or SOCI 101. An introduction to the analysis of data in the behavioral sciences using classification of data, measures of central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, analysis of variance and non-parametric tests. Examples of psychological and sociological concepts and data will be used to apply these techniques. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) Cross-listed under Sociology. (Psychology = Parent) This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 302 - Research Methods in Psychology


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 301. An introductory survey of principles and methods of design and analysis of experiments in the study of behavior. Experience in design, execution, and writing of laboratory reports is included. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) Students should plan to take this course by their junior year This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 303 - Research Methods II


    (2 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110, 301 and 302. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to implement an independent research study. Students will carry out data collection and analysis on a project and complete a paper reporting their findings and conclusions. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 305 - Behavioral Statistics for Health Professions


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 105 or higher (grade of “C” or better), and PSYC 110 or SOCI 101. You must also be a Nursing major. An introduction to the analysis of data in the behavioral sciences using classification of data, measures of central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, analysis of variance and nonparametric tests. This course is tailored for Nursing students. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 312 - Introduction to Psychological Testing


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 275. An introduction to the history, theory, and techniques of psychological measurement. Topics will include intelligence, personality, and achievement testing. Exposure to test administration and interpretation will be included in the course.
  
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    PSYC 315 - Introduction to Group Process


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and PYSC 275.  This course will introduce students to a variety of contemporary group counseling strategies and professional issues in group counseling.
  
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    PSYC 322 - Psychology of Adulthood and Aging


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: PSYC 110. A study of the physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development from young adulthood through later life. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 324 - Behavior Disorders of Childhood


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 221. A study of the etiology, symptomatology, and treatment of the major behavioral disorders of childhood. Other topics include diagnostic nomenclature and a historical and theoretical framework of childhood psychopathology.
  
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    PSYC 340 - Psychology of Religious Experience


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 3 additional hours in PSYC. A survey of the scientific study of religious behavior including the development of the psychology of religion, measures and methodology, leading contributors, and religious behaviors such as development, conversion, and mysticism. Cross-listed under Religion. (Psychology = Parent)
  
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    PSYC 375 - Introduction to Human Services


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Junior status (61 hours), Psychology or Sociology major, or permission of instructor, PSYC 110 or SOCI 101, plus 3 hours completed in the declared major. A survey of human service organizations and the nature of human service work. The structure of the human service delivery system in America will be explored, as well as the types of skills, knowledge, and values which are needed to enter the field and make it a career. This course may not be challenged. Cross-listed under Sociology. (Sociology = Parent)
  
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    PSYC 380 - Theories of Personality


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 3 additional hours in psychology. A survey of the major principles, theories, and empirical research related to the structure and development of personality. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 385 - Comparative Animal Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 plus 6 additional Psychology hours. Comparison of the similarities and differences in sensory systems, learning, memory, social organization, communication and development of closely related and relatively unrelated animals, including the human species.
  
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    PSYC 400 - Introduction to Counseling


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110, PSYC 221 or 222 or 223, PSYC 275 and PSYC 380, plus 3 additional hours in psychology. A survey of the major forms of counseling and psychotherapy. Other topics include ethical principles, establishing rapport, interviewing techniques, and assessment. The course will include role-playing and other activities to introduce the basic principles of therapeutic intervention.
  
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    PSYC 410 - Physiological Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 9 additional hours in psychology. Psychophysiological and psychochemical bases of behavior and other related phenomena. Includes a study of the conditions, mechanisms and functions of sensation and perception.
  
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    PSYC 420 - Principles of Learning


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 9 additional hours in psychology. An overview of the classical theories of learning with an emphasis on the application of learning theory to applied settings.
  
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    PSYC 425 - Sensation and Perception


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 9 additional hours in Psychology. A survey of the structures and functions of the human sensory modalities, including a focus on research concerning sensory and perceptual capabilities. Topics include: physiology of sensory systems, perceptual development, perception of color, objects, space, movement, sound, touch, smell and taste as well as perceptual illusions.
  
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    PSYC 430 - Cognitive Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: PSYC 110 plus 9 additional hours in psychology. A survey of cognitive psychology, to include memory, decision-making, problem-solving, and language.
  
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    PSYC 469 - Internship in Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Psychology major, PSYC 110 and 9 additional hours in Psychology of which 6 hours must be upper level psychology courses completed in residence, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the major, junior status (61 hours or more), and permission of the department chair. An internship under supervised observation and participation in a human service agency during a major semester only (may not be taken as an accelerated course). Internships are designed to familiarize students with how human service work is organized and delivered, and to explore career opportunities in human service fields. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Application forms requesting permission to participate in an Internship can be obtained from the department office. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 470 - Internship in Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Psychology major, PSYC 110 and 9 additional hours in Psychology of which 6 hours must be upper level psychology courses completed in residence, a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the major, junior status (61 hours or more), and permission of the department chair. An internship under supervised observation and participation in a human service agency during a major semester only (may not be taken as an accelerated course). Internships are designed to familiarize students with how human service work is organized and delivered, and to explore career opportunities in human service fields. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. Application forms requesting permission to participate in an internship can be obtained from the department office. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 471 - Directed Research in Psychology


    (1 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 plus 6 hours of psychology credit; 3.0 GPA. Exceptions can be made by the department chair. Projects may include library research, data collection and entry. Grading will be Pass/Fail. Application forms can be obtained from the department or online at the department web page. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 472 - Directed Research in Psychology


    (2 hours) Prerequisites: Psychology 110 plus 6 hours of psychology credit; 3.0 GPA. Exceptions can be made by the department chair. Projects may include library research, data collection and entry; extension of a previous project, assist in data collection and entry; statistical analyses. Grading will be Pass/Fail. Application forms can be obtained from the department or online at the department web page. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 473 - Directed Research in Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 302; 3.0 GPA. Course can be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours. Exceptions can be made by the department chair. Independent research project developed and conducted by the student with the assistance of the professor. Grading will be Pass/Fail. Application forms can be obtained from the department or online at the department web page. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    PSYC 475 - History and Systems of Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: PSYC 110 and 9 additional hours in psychology. A historical survey of psychology from prescientific periods to the present day. Issues and trends in current psychological thought are examined. This course cannot be challenged.

Sociology

  
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    SOCI 101 - Principles of Sociology


    (3 hours) An introduction to the basic concepts, terminology, and research in the field of sociology. Focus is upon the ways the unique sociological perspective can provide understanding of group behavior and human relationships. Note: All students placed in MATH 099 must complete the course successfully before being allowed Into SOCI 101.
  
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    SOCI 203 - Social Problems


    (3 hours) An examination of contemporary social problems with emphasis on the impact these problems have on social behavior.
  
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    SOCI 205 - Anthropology


    (3 hours) An introduction to the basic concepts, terminology, and research in physical and cultural anthropology. Focus is upon cultural comparisons of social institutions in various societies, from early preliterate to modern non-Western and Western societies.
  
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    SOCI 250 - Social Psychology


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or PSYC 110. A study of the effects of the social experience on the behavior of individuals. Topics may include: attitudes, persuasion, conformity, aggression, prosocial behavior, attraction and prejudice. Cross-listed under Psychology. (Psychology = Parent)
  
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    SOCI 300 - American Popular Culture


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101. This course is designed to introduce students to critical analysis of contemporary popular culture in the United States. Students will get an overview of the many insights, findings, concepts, and perspectives that are held by a wide variety of interdisciplinary popular culture scholars today. Several prominent areas of popular culture to be studied include: advertising, television, film, music, and cyber culture. Teaching methods include lectures, discussions, group work, and video presentations. The main objective of this course is to enable students to better understand the social world around them and their role in it. This course may not be challenged.
  
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    SOCI 301 - Introduction to Behavioral Statistics


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: MATH 105 or higher (grade of “C” or better), and PSYC 110 or SOCI 101. An introduction to the analysis of data in the behavioral sciences using classification of data, measures of central tendency, variability, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, analysis of variance and nonparametric tests. Examples of psychological and sociological concepts and data will be used to apply these techniques. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) Cross-listed under Psychology. (Psychology = Parent) This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    SOCI 312 - Marriage and the Family


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101. A study of the family in contemporary society, with emphasis on the factors contributing to success or conflict in marriage. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    SOCI 324 - Sociology of Religion


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101. The study of religion as a social institution, focusing on its functions and interrelationship with society. Cross-listed under Religion. (Sociology = Parent)
  
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    SOCI 336 - Technology and Behavior


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to explore how technology has shaped human history, human ways of thinking and acting, and shaping the future of human interpersonal and societal interactions.
  
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    SOCI 340 - Introduction to Social Work


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101. A general introduction to social work, including history, philosophy, organization, methods, and settings with emphasis on rehabilitation and other community services. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    SOCI 360 - Urban Sociology


    (3 hours) Prerequisite: SOCI 101. An analysis of urban society, the processes of urbanization, and the nature of urban life.
  
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    SOCI 375 - Introduction to Human Services


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: Junior status (61 hours), Psychology or Sociology major, or permission of instructor, PSYC 110 or SOCI 101, plus 3 hours completed in the declared major. A survey of human service organizations and the nature of human service work. The structure of the human service delivery system in America will be explored, as well as the types of skills, knowledge, and values which are needed to enter the field and make it a career. Cross-listed under Psychology. (Sociology = Parent) This course may not be challenged.
  
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    SOCI 400 - Criminology


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: SOCI 101 or CRIM 210. A study of crime, delinquency, and the mechanisms of social control. Cross-listed under Criminal Justice. (Sociology = Parent)
  
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    SOCI 426 - The Development of Sociological Theory


    (3 hours) Prerequisites: SOCI 101, 203 and three additional hours of sociology. The analysis of sociological theory from social, political, and historical perspectives. This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    SOCI 427 - Introduction to Social Research


    (4 hours) Prerequisites: SOCI 101, 203, 301, 426. The exploration of practical problems in social science research design, e.g., hypothesis construction, operationalization of variables, measurement, sampling, questionnaire development, data collection and processing, index and scale construction, elementary analysis of data, etc. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 2 hours. (Laboratory fee required) This course cannot be challenged.
  
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    SOCI 428 - Social Research Practicum


    (2 hours) Prerequisites: SOCI 301, 426 and 427. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to implement a social research study. Students will carry out data collection and analysis on a project and complete a paper reporting their findings and conclusions. This course cannot be challenged.
 

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